Dilorom Mukhsinova – Uzbekistan

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “To build a bright future we must educate the people who will construct it – our children – in the spirit of peace, love, and freedom”.

Dilorom Mukhsinova was born in 1952 in Ferghana, Uzbekistan. She has been a school secondary school teacher since 1973, whose dedication to teaching is appreciated by the local community, her colleagues, students and their parents. She is devoted to peace, freedom, and tolerance and the development of mutual understanding between people despite different views and social backgrounds. This is especially important in this region, the center of a major conflict zone in Central Asia with the danger of extremist tendencies increasing among youth and the local

population. Dilorom’s teaching supports tolerance and respect for the diverse cultures of the world and is a significant contribution to peace and harmony in her community.

Dilorom Mukhsinova - Uzbekistan rogné redim 70p.jpg

Dilorom Mukhsinova – Uzbekistan

She works for the Town Council.

She graduated from Ferghana State Pedagogical Institute, English Language Department in 1973 and the Historical Department of the same Institute in 1979. She has been working since 1973 as an English and history teacher and has also been a guide for tourists in Uzbekistan. She has taught both at Ferghana State Pedagogical Institute and at a local secondary school. She has served as Deputy Directory at her school and is currently the supervisor of foreign language teachers. She was elected as a deputy of the town council of the first convocation (1995-2000) and has received an award for her role in the education of people in Uzbekistan. She is married and has two children.

She has extensive work experience with children and young people. She has worked in education since 1973. She is a valued staff member and a leader of a 125 year-old school, known in her city for its dedication, commitment and maintaining its cultural traditions while providing its students with knowledge and a high quality educational experience. Students also participate and regularly win prizes in district, regional and inter-municipal competitions on the knowledge of subjects taught in schools. For more than ten years, at least one student from this school has won a scholarship to study in the USA from the American Council for International Education. The alumni of this school have found employment in many different branches of activity in Uzbekistan and abroad.

There are many obstacles and hindrances to the development of the teaching in Uzbekistan, including a lack of current professional literature and opportunities for the professional development of teachers. Despite these challenges, Dilorom Mukhsinova uses modern teaching methods that engage her students and involve them in social and public activities. She also works with the parents of students to influence them positively. Her methods and achievements go well beyond the required curriculum: Her students are taught social responsibility and are encouraged to take their lives in their hands by doing their best to improve the life around them. She teaches her students to increase their consciousness of the world and engage in critical thought.

Over her many years of teaching, she has influenced many students to contribute positively to the world around them through her classroom teaching and the coordination of many non-formal youth organizations that work to promote peace, tolerance and respect.

Dilorom Mukhsinova has also been successful in broadening the curriculum of study available to her students. She has initiated the addition of new studies at her school, including Korean, French, and courses in local and world cultures. She tries to inspire her students with a sense of curiosity and respect for both Uzbek and foreign cultures and teaches them that each culture and nation has its own traditions that have developed over hundreds of years. This serves as a premise for a spirit of peace, tolerance and respect for both human beings within and outside their own culture and country.

The result is that in a country with relatively little Western and global exposure, students are being given an education that supports them in broadening their minds and thinking globally, while still being proud of their own culture and traditions. This is especially important in this particular region, the center of a major conflict zone in Central Asia with the danger of extremist and fundamentalist tendencies increasing among youth and the local population. Mukhsinova?s teaching supports tolerance and respect for the diverse cultures of the world and is a significant contribution to peace and harmony in her community. (Read all on 1000peacewomen 2005).

See: Uzbek Womens – proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

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