Kumiko Yokoi – Japan

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Kumiko Yokoi uses the power of music to spread messages of peace, dignity, and hope. Millions of people of all ages in Ireland, Sri Lanka, Nicaragua, Vietnam, and the United States have been inspired by the singer’s performances; profits from her concerts and CDs have benefited children, particularly those with disabilities. She is also known as a fighter for worker’s rights in her home country, Japan.

She says: “Sing the love, love the song I want to fight with dreams in my soul, with you Sing the love, love the song, I want to fight with dreams in my soul”.

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Kumiko Yokoi – Japan

Kumiko Yokoi uses the power of music to spread messages of peace, dignity, and hope. Millions of people of all ages in Ireland, Sri Lanka, Nicaragua, Vietnam, and the United States have been inspired by her performances; profits from her concerts and CDs have benefited children, particularly those with disabilities. She is also known as a fighter for worker’s rights in her home country, Japan.

When Kumiko saw the pain and suffering of children – second and third generation Agent Orange victims – at a rehabilitation center in Vietnam, her heart was broken. “The village is a holy place,” she said. “It has experienced peace and the cruelty of war.” As she has been doing since 1973, she dedicated her 2004 concert to help children. Vietnam has about 1.2 million children with disabilities, 150,000 who are Agent Orange victims.

The concert was her fourth in Vietnam. She first performed there in 1973 when she sang Stop! Tank for northern soldiers during the Vietnam War. She is especially moved by children and families whose health has been devastated by environmental catastrophes. In 1985 she sang in Nicaragua and in 2001 she donated the profit from sales of a CD to children in Afghanistan.

Inspired by Irish songs that arose from the civil rights movement, she has translated Irish ballads into Japanese. Her own songs, such as “Sing the Love – Long the Song” and “Same Sky, Same Children,” send the universal message that all children should live in peace in a future that is bright.

Kumiko received a singing degree from National Music University, sang in a chorus, and began soloing in 1969. Her popularity in Japan comes without the commercialization that normally accompanies success. (1000peacewomen).

Japanese websites (two translated into english by Google):

Japanese singer and peace activist Kumiko Yokoi also sent a message in support of Agent Orange victims: “I visit Viet Nam every year and interact with child victims.There are second- and even third-generation victims, and this fills me with sadness and anger”, she said. “It is my wish that the US court will award Vietnamese victims the same compensation given to American soldiers”. (full text).

Japan, articles, photos and news brief on ‘International Action Center’.

Veteran Japanese singer Kumiko Yokoi, who was also an anti-American war activist during the 1970s, will perform as part of a live music programme in HCM City this weekend. Yokoi sang at many rallies calling for an end to the American war in Viet Nam during the early 1970s. She came to Ha Noi in 1972 and stood by the side of Vietnamese soldiers to protest the American bombardment of Ha Noi. In this music show, to be entitled Giai Dieu Ban Be (Melody of Friends), Yokoi will reprise the anti-war songs she once performed in Ha Noi … (full text, 07-05-2005).

Ca sĩ Nhật Kumiko Yokoi biểu diễn tại Việt Nam.

… Singer Kumiko will perform five songs during the concert, including Sing the Love – Love the Sing and Same Sky, Same Children, both of which are original works. Through each song she wants to send the message: all children should have a bright future and live in peace. The National Fund for Vietnamese Children was founded 12 years ago, and has helped almost 200,000 children by connecting them with sponsors. However, Dao said the number of children with disabilities in Viet Nam exceeds the amount the fund can provide for. Viet Nam has about 1.2 million of children with disability, 150,000 of whom are Agent Orange victims. Dao said she hopes Kumiko’s concert will help the fund raise money for children with disabilities and add a voice in the fight for compensation for Agent Orange victims in Viet Nam. Kumiko has performed in countries throughout the world to raise money for charitable causes. She is also known as a fighter for worker’s rights in Japan. (full text).

links:

including Japanese folk singer Kumiko Yokoi who has visited the city … ;

Vietnam Veterans vow help, May 28, 2006;

SCRIPTUM, modern japanese prints;

Yokoi Kumiko và ước nguyện VN, 06/05/2005;

Huyền thoại về một niềm tin sống – Kỳ 2;

Viet bao.

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