Eunice Nangueve Inacio – Angola

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Goes with ‘Assuming Authority‘.

She says: “I wish to see women free of poverty and illiteracy, bringing peace and equitable development in Angola, to see women leaders prevent armed conflict and promote inclusive, just governance.”

Eunice Nangueve Inacio – Angola

She was born in Angola in 1948 into a religious protestant family. Her background and academic pursuits did not distance Eunice from local people. In 1985, she headed the welfare program in Ministry of Social Affairs, focusing on children and war-displaced people. In 1991, she became the national director for training social workers. Through her efforts today about 600 local peace promoters have been trained and work in 14 provinces. Approximately 120 communities have been supported with local peace initiative grants to provide shelter to thousands affected by war.Eunice Nangueve Inacio was born in Angola in 1948 into a religious protestant family. But her good background and academic pursuits did not distance her from local people.

In 1985, she headed the welfare program in Ministry of Social Affairs, focusing on children and war-displaced people. In 1991, she became the national director for training social workers.

When Huambo Province was occupied and fought over by three different liberation movements, Eunice returned to her home province of Huambo and worked for British Charity, Save the Children to help displaced children and orphans whose parents had died in the war.

The Angolan Peace Process, launched in 1991 with an accord between the Government and the rebel movement UNITA, failed after the 1992 elections. Eunice became a focal point for running humanitarian program for children in Huambo during the two-year occupation of the province by the UNITA rebel army. She coordinated the National Programme for Family Tracing for Separated Children. After the breakdown of the cease-fire and Angola Peace Building Program, she coordinated national civil society programs, which aimed at building peace and ending the war cycles.

The peace process failed several times. High-level diplomacy, mediated by the UN, also did not succeed in bringing UNITA on board. However, initiatives by Eunice Inacio led to the signing of the Lusaka protocol in 1994.

Through her efforts today about 600 Local Peace Promoters have been trained and work in 14 provinces. Approximately 120 communities have been supported with local peace initiative project grants to provide shelter to thousands affected by war in municipalities.

Other institutions that have benefited from Inacio’s work are peace movements, including all the principal churches under the leadership of Ecumenical Peace Coordinating Council, and the national NGO Forum. (Read on 1000 peacewomen – Ignacio).

To get a picture of humans condition, of what was happening in Angola’s Society, read the long article of a delegation visiting Angola, reported by Michael Clark of the Anglican Church of observations. He writes: Despite the cease-fire of April 4th (2002), things haven’t changed a great deal. Nor will they, perhaps, without outside help and continued pressure for change – especially in the provinces.

links:

web networks;

Christian Aid;

links en portugues:

Angonoticias;

c-r.org;

Africanidades;

Intersindical, and their Homepage Sindicato Trabajadores.

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