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Index February 2006

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Kimpa Vita – Congo 1684 to 1706

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A truly remarkable African woman not so long ago (was) Kimpa Vita / Dona Beatriz. Before I give a brief account of her life and history I would like to share one of her prophecies: She announced that she would return as a man in future and build a huge Church independent of Rome.

Kimpa Vita / Dona Beatriz, 1684 – 1706, Congo Brazzaville, Democratic Republic of Congo / Northern Angola. In recent history Africa has been home to a number of Spiritual icons, who have inevitably changed the face of Christianity by creating Indigenous African Churches, (by Elaine M. Lumbu, see on this page).

Kimpa Vita – Congo 1684 to 1706. This is a drawig (1), showig how she seemed to look like in reality …

… and here how she is seen by today’s peoples.

(1) I found this drawing on this Google images search, the page is said belonging to perso.wanadoo.fr/ eglise.animiste/polyt2.htm, a page of the catholic church, but this link is actually not working. And, sorry, the site the Internet Archive is censured here in the U.A.E. So, if you live in a country having access, just click on this link (http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.eglise.animiste.fr/).

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Oung Chanthol – Cambodia

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Linked to our presentation The Cambodian Women’s Crisis Center CWCC.

Linked also to our presentation The Fight against Trafficking in Women and Children.

She says: “The suffering of women encourages us to work, to do more to help. We are human beings. We cannot ignore their situation.”

Oung Chanthol – Cambodia

She works for the Cambodian Women’s Crisis Center (CWCC).

Oung Chanthol (born 1967), was cofounder of the Cambodian Women’s Crisis Center (CWCC) in 1997 and is its current executive director. The CWCC has helped over 55,600 female victims of violence, rape and trafficking in its drop-in centers and shelters. It provides legal counseling, victims’ reintegration, community awareness programs, and raises general public awareness through a media campaign. The center receives financial support from the German government and international NGOs. The Cambodian Women’s Crisis Center looks similar to other shop houses in the area. The steep stairs lead to a small office where its founder does dangerous work saving the lives of thousands of Cambodian women. The face of a woman stares out of the posters on the wall. One poster reads: “Domestic violence is condemned by every culture.” The other pronounces: “A life free of violence: it’s our right.”
The woman working in this room has dedicated her life to eradicating violence against women through the center that she co-founded and currently directs. Indeed, when the center was established in 1997, Oung Chanthol didn’t know that she would have such an arduous task ahead.

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Edward Broadbent – Canada

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Edward Broadbent is President of the International Centre for Human Rights and Democratic Development, a Canadian sponsored initiative in support of international human rights issues.
Edward Broadbent holds a Ph.D. in political science and began his career as a professor of Political Science at York University in Toronto. In 1968, he was elected to Parliament where he served until he resigned in 1989. From 1978 through 1982, Mr. Broadbent also served as Vice President of Socialist International, an organization which links social democratic parties around the world. He was particularly involved in efforts to bring peace to war-torn Central America.

Edward Broadbent – Canada

Mr. Broadbent was made a member of the Canadian Privy Council in 1982. As Leader of the New Democratic Party, he struggled for an equitable tax system, equality for women, the constitutional entrenchment of aboriginal rights and relief from poverty for Canada’s children. In his last years of leadership, he was often chosen as the man most Canadians wanted as Prime Minister.

He says: “There is today a new-found vitality in the UN which must be nurtured and a potential for bold and principled action which needs to be channelled and developed. The year 1995 offers a unique opportunity to do that.”

“Your 50 Communities programme is an imaginative means of illustrating the spirit and purpose of the UN and showing that the values and principles it fosters belong to all peoples, regardless of culture or history. It should also forge enduring links between citizens and this distant, New York based organization which, for too many, is little more than symbols, blue helmets, a flag, white vehicles, appearing from time to time in troubled corners of the world.” (See on International Institute for Sustainable Development).

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Judge Luigi Tosti – Italy

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You may see that I present more rebells these times. Yes, I am convinced that rebells are an important part of our culture, of our society, of the struggle for freedom. No freedom has been won without in the beginning a person or a group of persons trying to get this singular part of freedom against a majority of persons not willing to give this freedom. Every cultural changment of any society is more or less in a conflict with what is an installed culture. Most of the rebells pay a price, with life, or regarding their privat and professional situation.

We in Europe have some experience with all that, and meanwhile we may have some skills to handle situations – more or less – but we have still work to do. In any way, rebells are part of our life. So, let’s go on with the show. Today with an Italian Judge challenging us for a question important for us all.

But, again, this blog here is NOT the place to discuss this question. You may have strong convictions, here are presented persons having these question. The answer is given in any other discussion forum.

Judge Luigi Tosti – Italy

The History: On August the 15th, 2005 pope Benedict XVI states in his homely : «It is important that God be visible inside public and private houses, that God be present in the public life, with the presence of crucifixes inside public buildings. »

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Jens Bjørneboe – Norway 1920 – 1976

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Jens Bjørneboe (October 9, 1920–May 9, 1976) was a Norwegian painter, dramatist, essayist and novelist. His first published work was Poems (Dikt) in 1951. He is widely considered to be one of Norway’s most important post-war authors. Bjørneboe identified himself as an anarcho-nihilist. He was both a sharp critic of the society and was obsessed by the question of evils and wrong doings. He thought himself as a manic-depressive person with abusive use of alcohol. Jens Bjørneboe was born in 1920, in Kristiansand. In 1943 Bjørneboe fled to Sweden to avoid forced labor. During this exile, he met the German Jew Lisel Funk, who would later become his first wife. After having struggled with depression and alcoholism for a long time, he committed suicide on May 9th, 1976. (Read all the rest, also his literary career – rest on wikipedia).

Jens Bjørneboe – Norway

He was thinking about Human Rights, like here: “To me the United States once symbolized everything that guaranteed the human rights which made life livable—but it did so less and less. Passion may arise with a sudden unquenchable power, but it may die out slowly. I cannot say exactly when it was, but one day I realized I no longer loved the United States. It must have been in the beginning of the 1950s. America had become dangerous, frightening, scary. It represented conformity, corruption, violence, the world’s strongest military, and it aspired to become a world ruler … we who loved America” (1967)”.

Amputation – Texts for an Extraordinary Spectacle: The Norwegian iconoclast Jens Bjørneboe described this work as “a wild, almost surrealistic play—partly sinister, partly comic … directed against those forms of society that do not allow room for people who think differently from those in power.” In the horrible world of Amputation the dissident indivudal who cannot be normalized by conditioned reflexes may yet serve society—in the medical sense”. Bjørneboe wrote two versions of the play.

Here, in one volume, are both, plus supplemental texts that provide all the materials for an extraordinary reading and, for the avant- garde theatrical group, an extraordinary production of Bjørneboe’s shocking and prophetic warning ( Edited by Karl August Kvitko, Xenos Books, Los Angeles, February 2003, ISBN 1-879378-46-9 (paper). $15.00).

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Moses Zulu – Zambia

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Linked to our presentation of Children’s Town Malambanyama Zambia.

Also linked to our presentation of The International HUMANA PEOPLE TO PEOPLE Movement.

He is one of the New Heroes with the project Development Aid from People to People in Zambia (Children’s Town).

Moses Zulu – Zambia

He is a dynamic 40-year-old with a winning smile and extraordinary determination. In 1990 Zulu opened Children’s Town to serve Zambian children orphaned by the AIDS epidemic and other causes. He is devoted to helping these orphans find their way in life.

The program has grown from a handful of children living in tent shelters to almost 300 children and a staff of 22 living in six different houses. The grounds include a primary school and a community center. Zulu’s vision includes a plan to make Children’s Town self sustaining.

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Rozlana Taukina – Kazakhstan

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Linked with the Institute of war and peace … , with ANESMI, with Reporters without borders, and also with Lazzat Ishmukhamedova – Kazakhstan, and with Central Asia, Kazakhstan.

She says: “There should be peace on earth without war, hunger, and cataclysms. Natural calamities are beyond our control, but the others we can prevent! If the women of the world stand up to protect humankind, if they take an active social stand and do not let dictators and rogues rule, there would not be wars, genocide, crimes against humanity; there would not be hungry and poor people. There is no place for fanatics and terrorists in a thriving world. What we have in real life is quite the opposite. Cruelty, thirst for power and greed rule the world. Egotism and violation of moral principles by some state leaders bring their people to poverty, aggression and envy. They breed in their people the desire to hate and kill others. This is against human nature.” (Read here about her).

Rozlana Taukina – Kazakhstan

She is working for 3 associations:

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My answer about … Shafik Handal

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About Schafik Handal- El Salvador, on this site on January 28, 2006.

Dear Mr. Reynaldo Contreras-Valle,

sorry for you beeing troubled.

I do not enter the ideological dispute about any of the persons I present on my site, thinking that there are enough battles about ideology around the world, and in most cases each party is right in some aspects, and also wrong in others. So, in this way you have your opinion and I respect it as what it is: an opinion, not more.

Look, facts can be seen in different ways, I am sure an adversary of your thinking could proof that his way of thinking is as good as yours.

I present persons of different activities and believes, playing a role in the changing of our world, by working on some aspects of the humanity (Human Rights, Economy, Society etc.). I present persons I am ok with, but also others I have more difficulty with.

The goal of my sites is a vision about how rich, different, creative is our humanity in its going on for a better world. We all share one thing: the hope to make things better than they are. If we would agree each other, we would see the result on this humanity. But we do not.

An other goal is to interconnect people – as a non-directive form of networking. When we look to all what is done, with enthusiasm, with courage and selfless service to others, we can get a piece of hope for our humanity. We hear so many bad news, someone has to show how good we are, how much is done, how devoted many of us work for others.

What is very different in every one of us is our way of looking at things. Every one is individual in the way how our brain is interconnected in itself. Every one of us is seeing the reality in a slightly different way … as long as we are not stopped by ideology.

Nobody is really perfect, we all have strong sides and weak ones. But together, when comparing our visions, we can create new visions. New creative visions for our challenges.

But this needs the ability to listen to those having not the same viewpoint. Without this ability, nothing goes on in this way.

If you cannot accept the visions of those not sharing your viewpoint, I can not help you. I will let your answer on the site and put my mail there also.

I have no questions, as I am not battling on ideological items.

Have a nice day, Heidi.

P.S. of March 4, 2006: As I see today, the statement in question has been retired. I let my answer as an explication about the goals of this blog.

Kailash Satyarthi – India

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Linked with our presentation of South Asian Coalition on Child Servitude (SACCS).

Also linked with our presentation of 6th World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates.

Kailash Satyarthi has saved tens of thousands of lives. At the age of 26 he gave up a promising career as an electrical engineer and dedicated his life to helping the millions of children in India who are forced into slavery by powerful and corrupt business- and land-owners. His original idea was daring and dangerous. He decided to mount raids on factories — factories frequently manned by armed guards — where children and often entire families were held captive as bonded workers. (Red more on this page).

Kailash Satyarthi – India

He says: “If not now, then when? If not you, then who? If we are able to answer these fundamental questions, then perhaps we can wipe away the blot of human slavery.”

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Alla Yaroshinskaya – Russian Federation

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Linked with our presentation of Nuclear Weapons and Non-Proliferation – the Russian Perspective.

Linked also with Uni Cambridge, Event 24-02-2006.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Never be humiliated. Do not fear to have your own opinion and to make it public, even if your opinion does not coincide with the opinion of the authorities.”

Alla Yaroshinskaya – Russian Federation

She works for Soyuz Zhurnalistov Rossii (SZR), and for Regionalny grazhdansky front (RGF).

Alla Yaroshinskaya was born in 1953, in Zhitomir region of the Ukraine. She was graduating in from Kiev University and worked for 13 years as a correspondent of the local newspaper. At university she had been a political dissident. During her work she consistently tried to expose party corruption and suffered administrative penalties. At the end of 1986 she began to feel uneasy about the supposed evacuation of areas which had been contaminated by radiation from the Chernobyl accident in April that year, and she began to investigate.

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Chalmers Johnson – USA

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Linked with our presentation of some of his texts, with his presentation of July 12, 2007, and with America’s Empire of Bases.

Chalmers Johnson – USA

CHALMERS JOHNSON was born in 1931 in Phoenix and raised in Buckeye, Arizona. After World War II, in which his father served in the Navy in the Pacific, his family moved to Alameda, California, where he finished high school and earned a B.A. in economics at the University of California, Berkeley. He first saw Japan and Korea in 1953, when he served in the Navy during the Korean War.

Returning to Berkeley, he switched fields and earned both his M.A. and Ph.D. in political science. In 1962, he began teaching political science at Berkeley, and did so until 1988, when he moved to the San Diego campus of the University of California. He retired in 1992. At Berkeley he served as chairman of the Center for Chinese Studies from 1967 until 1972. He was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1976.

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Coretta Scott King – USA 1927-2006

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She was a famous Human Rights Activist and Leader.

Coretta Scott King – USA 1927-2006

Biographical Information (Taken from the King Center):

Coretta Scott King is one of the most influential women leaders in our world today. Prepared by her family, education, and personality for a life committed to social justice and peace, she entered the world stage in 1955 as wife of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and as a leading participant in the American Civil Rights Movement. Her remarkable partnership with Dr. King resulted not only in four talented children, but in a life devoted to the highest values of human dignity in service to social change. Mrs. King has traveled throughout our nation and world speaking out on behalf of racial and economic justice, women’s and children’s rights, gay and lesbian dignity, religious freedom, the needs of the poor and homeless, full-employment, health care, educational opportunities, nuclear disarmament and ecological sanity. In her distinguished and productive career, she has lent her support to democracy movements world-wide and served as a consultant to many world leaders, including Corazon Aquino, Kenneth Kaunda, and Nelson Mandela.

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Kinhide Mushakoji – Japan

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Linked with our presentation of Anatomy of global sex industry.

Also linked with our presentation of The Origins of the Mainstream JapaNIEs Cultural “Order”.

Linked also with our 2 presentations of NGO’s: ARENA, and IPRA.

Kinhide Mushakoji – Japan

He is currently a Board Member of the Asian Cultural Forum on Development (ACFOD), the UN Voluntary Fund for Technical Assistance in the Field of Human Rights, the President of the Asia-Pacific Human Rights Information Centre (Hu-Rights Osaka) and the International Peace Centre in Osaka (Peace Osaka).

He is Secretary-General of IMADR, Internat. Mouvement against all forms of Discrimination and Rascisme, Geneva and Tokyo.

In the academic field, Mushakoji is a Professor in the Department of International Relations of the Chubu University and the Director of the Chubu Institute of Advanced Studies. He teaches in Ferris University Japan. Formerly the Vice-Rector of the Regional and Global Studies Division of the United Nations University for 13 years, he is also former Director of the Institute of International Relations which he founded in 1969 at the Sophia University in Tokyo.

Kinhide Mushakoji (e-mail), a reputed Japanese authority on international affairs and a lifelong peace advocate, teaches in Ferris University, Japan, and is a director of the International Movement Against All Forms of Discrimination and Racism (IMADR). Formerly Vice-Rector of the Regional and Global Studies Division of the United Nations University for 13 years, Professor Mushakoji, who is particularly interested in peace research, is former Director of the Institute of International Relations which he founded in 1969 at Sophia University, Tokyo.

He has been a visiting professor at Princeton University and Northwestern University in the US.

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Hasanain Juaini – Indonesia

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Linked with our presentation of ashoka.

Hasanain Juaini is reforming Indonesia’s Muslim schools to encourage critical thinking, tolerance, democracy and civic participation. (Read more here).

Hasanain Juaini – Indonesia

He is a traditional religious teacher and leader who is reforming Indonesia’s Muslim boarding schools (pesantren) so they promote a practical understanding and implementation of pluralism, diversity, tolerance, and basic democratic values as they apply to daily life. He also encourages education for women, critical thinking, and participation in community development. Indonesia’s religious schools and their leaders wield much influence in their surrounding Muslim communities. Juaini is addressing some of the problems of the pesantren including the fact that: 1) many pesantrens ignore social problems in their area; 2) some pesantren have been co-opted by the state or political parties and have become tools to control and satisfy immediate needs; 3) many tend to have dogmatic, exclusive, and authoritarian teaching materials and methods; and 4) most pesantren give more attention to the education of boys than girls.

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Medea Benjamin – USA

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Linked to our presentation Global Exchange.

Linked to our presentation of Leslie Cagan.

Medea Benjamin is a well-known political activist and Founding Director of the San Francisco-based NGO Global Exchange, which advocates “fair trade” alternatives to corporate globalization.

She has also been involved with anti-war groups such as United for Peace and Justice and Code Pink: Women for Peace. In 2000, she ran for the Senate on the Green Party ticket from California, basing her campaign on such issues as a living wage, education, and universal healthcare. In 1999, San Francisco Magazine elevated her to their “power list” of the “60 Players Who Rule the Bay Area.”

Medea Benjamin – USA

Together with Kevin Danaher and Kirsten Irgens-Moller she created Gobal exchange (see link above).

She is also the co-founder of CODEPINK: Women for Peace, a women’s group that has been organizing creative actions against the war and occupation of Iraq. CODEPINK is pushing for a reorientation of budget priorities in the US to focus on heath care, education and housing, not war. Code Pink now has over 250 chapters throughout the United States.

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Dina Abdel Wahab – Egypt

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Linked with the presentation ashoka.

Linked also with our presentation of the Baby Academy she works also for.

Linked also with her text Working Mothers – The Balancing Act.

Dina Abdel-Wahab is pioneering the integration of special needs children with “normal” children in schools, a first important step toward achieving society-wide integration in Egypt. She recognizes that the early preschool years offer an especially promising opportunity to change attitudes, pave the way for broader societal reform, and set a different expectation of normalcy early in life.

Dina Abdel Wahab – Egypt

At least two million Egyptians are disabled or have special needs as a result of genetic or neurological problems, and half of these are children. Only about one percent of children and adults with special needs receive services from the government and citizen sector organizations.

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Kafil Ahmed – Bangladesh

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Linked with our presentation Oxfam.

Meet Kafil Ahmed is an Oxfam project officer in Bangladesh. “My job is to find organisations and groups who need support to combat poverty in their region. I check that everything is going well, and help them solve their problems. Today I am going to Manub Mukti Sangstha (MMS), an organisation working with some of the very poorest people in the country. These are people living on chors, low islands of silt built up in the rivers, which are easily flooded and washed away.”

Kafil Ahmed – Bangladesh

A day in the life of Kafil Ahmed: 9am: “I leave Dhaka and travel by car and boat to MMS, an organisation working with poor people.” ” At MMS I will talk to the staff, and will visit a village to see if the work done after last year’s floods helped to save lives and belongings in this year’s floods.”

2pm: “I arrive at MMS’ headquarters. They’re helping people to be better prepared for the floods, so that they have some protection.” 2.15pm: “A meeting with all the staff. They tell me how things have been going since my last visit. They are involved in a lot of projects:

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Mimi Silbert – USA

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Linked with our two Humanitarian Texts Statement of US Rep. Nancy Pelosi, and Making Rehabilitation Into a Serious Business.

Not many people choose to spend their lives working with convicted felons and drug addicts. But Mimi Silbert, founder of San Francisco’s Delancey Street rehabilitation project, has committed her every waking hour to helping ex-cons become productive, welcome members of society. (Read more on Giraffe Heroes).

Mimi Silbert – USA

In 1971 Mimi Silbert founded Delancey Street with four residents, a thousand dollar loan and a dream. She envisioned a place where substance abusers, former felons and others who had hit bottom would, through their own efforts, be able to turn their lives around.

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Sueli Pereira Pini – Brazil

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I believe in the humanization of justice. I really love what I do.” And for her, a true judicial reform has to begin with the judges’ attitude: “More important than giving a verdict is seeking a negotiation between the parties involved. More important than analyzing the paper work of the case, is listening to the people.”

Sueli Pereira Pini – Brazil

She is a judge of law and coordinator of the Juizado Especial Central Cível e Criminal da Comarca de Macapá (Special Civil Court of Macapá), the capital of Amapá. Her philosophy is very clear: “Justice is there to be made”. But how can this service be rendered in settlements spread throughout the forest? Well, if the people cannot go to justice, justice will come to them.

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Govindappa Venkataswamy – India

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His full name is Dr. Govindappa Venkataswamy, but to more than 2 million surgical patients and 16,000,000 outpatients, he’s known affectionately as “Dr. V.” The 83 year-old chairman of Aravind Eye Hospitals, Dr. Venkataswamy is my hero.

Govindappa Venkataswamy – India

Dr. V. was born in 1918 to a farming family in a small village in South India. He received his medical degree from the Stanley Medical College in Chennai and joined the Indian Army Medical Corps to practice obstetrics. It was about this time that tragedy visited Dr. V. in the form of rheumatoid arthritis, a degenerative disease that attacked his hands. Although unable to practice obstetrics, Dr. V. did not give up. He began studying ophthalmology and had instruments specially designed for his arthritic hands – each one custom-made to fill a specific need. These instruments enabled him to perform as many as 100 cataract surgeries a day. He quickly became the most admired cataract surgeon in India. (Read the rest on MY HERO).

In 1956, Dr. Venkataswamy was appointed head of the Department of Ophthalmology at the Government Madurai Medical College, and eye surgeon at the Government Erskine Hospital in Madurai. He held these posts for 20 years and made remarkable contributions to research, clinical service and community programs, as noted below in biographical data. (Read more on One World Sight Project).

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Lida Yusupova – Russia / Chechnya

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The Professor Thorolf Rafto Memorial Prize for 2005 is awarded to the Chechnyan lawyer and human rights advocate Ms Lida Yusupova, in recognition of her brave and unrelenting efforts to document human rights violations and act as a spokeswoman for the forgotten victims of the war in Chechnya. Ms Yusupova struggles to defend human dignity in a chaotic war situation and in a context where the working conditions and security of human rights advocates and journalists are increasingly compromised.

Lida Yusupova – Russia / Chechnya

Lida Yusupova is the coordinator of the Grozny office of the Moscow-based human rights organisation Memorial. This small group is one of the few human rights organisations still operating in Chechnya, providing the world with crucial information on violations of human rights in this Russian republic.

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Wei Cheng – China

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I’m a Party member, a member of society and I act on what is in my mind. If people share my vision, they too will need to act on it; but if they think it is someone else’s problem, nobody will act.”

Wei Cheng – China

Jinyita Village, Daning County, Shanxi Province, China

Cheng Wei (54) left her comfortable job and home and moved to a remote village in Shanxi Province, China. She put all her efforts – and her own funds – into developing the economy and culture of the area, focusing on road building, electricity and water supplies, schools, and the purchase of trees and seeds.

Sorry, not any other sure information is available through Google. All 25 pages of Google links by Images arriving under ‘Wei Cheng’ are describing other persons that the one of the photo we have. Thus, any text can not be recognished as belonging to ‘our’ Wei Cheng.

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Sufia Khatun – Bangladesh

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Linked with our presentation of Mohammad Yunus – Bangladesh.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Sufia Khatun – Bangladesh

Sufia Khatun says to Kafil Ahmed, an Oxfam project officer in Bangladesh: “My husband is a labourer, and travels around to find work. My children go to the MMS school. MMS gave me a loan, and I bought two cows. I sell the milk they produce to support my family.”

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Mohammad Yunus – Bangladesh

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Linked with Sufia Khatun – Bangladesh, with Rebuilding Through Social Entrepreneurship.

Muhammad Yunus is the founder of the Grameen Bank of Bangladesh, which serves 5 million families with microfinancial services, a founding director of Grameen Foundation USA and a founding member of Ashoka’s Global Academy for Social Entrepreneurship (www.ashoka.org). He has transformed the lives of thousands of impoverished people through the grameen bank — a scheme that threw established banking norms to the wind by lending money only to the poorest of the poor. see on The Tribune.

Mohammad Yunus – Bangladesh

Loans of a few dollars for tools to husk rice, to buy a cow or a sewing machine – all small things have made a big difference to people’s lives. Many of the 1.2 million grameen borrowers, 90 percent of them women, had been reduced to begging for a living. Now most of them have a roof over their heads and can support themselves. Yet Yunus does not find his achievements extraordinary, he explains that the problem with traditional approaches to poverty alleviation and development is that they fail to seek things at a grass-roots level.

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Ayaan Hirsi Ali – Somalia & Netherlands

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Put on this site on June 30, 2006: See also our presentation in french of … encore Ayaan Hirsi Ali.

Linked with our following presentations: ‘Muslim protests for pictures‘,

Rethinking Islam‘,

Talisma Nasreen – Bangladesh & France‘,

Safia Hussaini – Nigeria‘,

le coran et le prophète – in french‘.

and ‘again Muslim Protests for Pictures‘;

She says: If I were to say the things that I say now in the Dutch Parliament in Somalia, I would be killed.

Ayaan Hirsi Ali – Somalia & Netherlands

First my comment: as many Europeans, I like to know me tolerant, multicultural … as a nice, open, progressive individual, good for this humanity. And suddenly I say stop … no more tolerance with people crying at every moment ‘death to … ‘ … to whatever they do not like, to whomever saying anything wrong in their eyes.

Stop tolerance to this integrisme, say NO to this few crowds, able only to cry ‘death to … ‘…

… and we must help the normal, peaceful muslims how to handle this fanatic crowd. To do that, we must first become able ourselves to know what is our reaction. We cannot longer tolerate the continuous abuse of the human rights of women, of individuals having their own ideas … of people no more wanting follow religious rules but wanting follow modern, rational, logical thinking.

If we want the Human Rights followed, we have to defend them. For everybody.

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Delphine NANA MEKOUNTE – Cameroun

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Linked to our presentation of SUMMARY REPORT OF THE YAOUNDE COLLOQUIUM of February 4, 2006.

Also linked to our presentation of African Civil Society for the Information Society ACSIS

and the CEFEPROD, a NGO with ECOSOC status, concomitantly Coordinator of the Central African Sub-region Civil Society under the African Civil Society for the Information Society

both of February 4, 2006.

Delphine NANA MEKOUNTE – Cameroun

Présidente ACSIS ( African Civil Society for the Information Society), Representante de SCASI (la Famille Africaine sur la Société de l’Information).

She is also General Coordinator of CEFEPROD, concomitantly Coordinator of the Central African Sub-region Civil Society under the African Civil Society for the Information Society and Representative of the African Civil Society at the World Bureau of WSIS,

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Magdalena Sepúlveda – Chile & Colombia

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Linked to our presentation on Association for Women’s Rights in Development of February 3, 2006.

Also linked to our presentation on again op-icescr of February 3, 2006.

Magdalena Sepúlveda – Chile & Colombia

First: In the context of UPEACE Activities, Magdalena Sepúlveda is giving the following course: Global and Regional Human Rights Mechanisms, next Feb 27 – Mar 03, 2006, Category: International Law and Human Rights, Location: Council Room. Location: University for Peace, San José, Costa Rica.

Bio: Dr. Magdalena Sepulveda is a Chilean lawyer. She got her graduation in 2000 at the University of Essex, Human Rights Center.

She holds a Ph.D in International Human Rights Law from Utrecht University in the Netherlands and an LL.M in human rights law from University of Essex, UK. She lectures at several universities in Latin America and has provided technical assistance and training on human rights to NGOs, IGOs and governments. Magdalena has worked as a researcher at the Netherlands Institute for Human Rights, staff attorney at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and was the Co-Director of the Department of International Law and Human Rights of the United Nations affiliated University for Peace in San Jose, Costa Rica.

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Taslima Nasreen – Bangladesh

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Linked to our (french spoken) presentation ‘violence contre les femmes vient à 91% de l’entourage’ of January 2, 2006.

Also linked to our presentation on Rethinking Islam of January 20, 2006.

Also linked t our presentation on Safia Hussaini – Nigeria of October 31, 2005.

And linked to our presentation Moslems Protest for pictures of January 3, 2006.

She says: “Nature says women are human beings, men have made religions to deny it. Nature says women are human beings, men cry out NO!”

Taslima Nasreen – Bangladesh, a physician, a writer, a radical feminist, human rights activist and a secular humanist.

She says: ”They have made Noorjahan stand in a hole in the courtyard, there she stands, submerged to her waist with head hanging. They are throwing stones at Noorjahan, those stones are striking my body.”

She says also: “If any religion allows the persecution of the people of different faiths, if any religion keeps women in slavery, if any religion keeps people in ignorance, then I can’t accept that religion.”

She says: “The political parties use religion for their own interests and whenever they find any criticism about religion, they can’t tolerate it.”

Images of beaten, hanged, dying, desperate and violented women.

Taslima Nasreen says: ‘Humankind is facing an uncertain future. The probability of new kinds of rivalry and conflict looms large. In particular, the conflict is between two different ideas, secularism and fundamentalism. I don’t agree with those who think the conflict is between two religions, namely Christianity and Islam, or Judaism and Islam. After all there are fundamentalists in every religious community. I don’t agree with those people who think that the crusades of the Middle Ages are going to be repeated soon. Nor do I think that this is a conflict between the East and the West. To me, this conflict is basically between modern, rational, logical thinking and irrational, blind faith. To me, this is a conflict between modernity and anti-modernism. While some strive to go forward, others strive to go backward. It is a conflict between the future and the past, between innovation and tradition, between those who value freedom and those who do not.’

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Eva Latham – Netherlands

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The Glass Ceiling in the Netherlands (for women to rise high level responsibility), Part I – The Dutch Paradox (a discussion) – Dr. Eva Latham, President, Human Rights Teaching International in The Hague, feels the problem in the Netherlands has deep, and unique, cultural roots:

Eva Latham – Netherlands

“It is not only that men do nothing to promote equality in policy measures, but what I observe is also that women who have the power to push for those policies, do not do so. Mostly these are women who themselves got through the glass ceiling by the help of their relationship with men on an individual basis, be it in politics or otherwise. So what you see in the Netherlands, at least when you see women who have broken through the glass ceiling, is that other mechanisms than “gender equality policies” were the reason.

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