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Index March 2006

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Durga Sob – Nepal

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Linked with our presentations of Dalit Women and Reservation Policy, and also of DALIT WOMEN: The Triple Oppression of Dalit Women in Nepal.

And linked with our presentation of Feminist Dalit Organization (FEDO) – Nepal

She says: “Nepalese Dalit issue is always hidden in national and international level. We want equal society to live as human beings (not ‘men’). So we want your solidarity to eliminate caste (Untouchability) from society.” (Read more here).

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Sorry, I can not find any photo of Durga Sob, Nepal (see also my comment ‘Brave women without photos‘).

She works for the Feminist Dalit Organization.

The hazards, which Dalit women in Nepal are subjected to, are double: one from the caste based socio-economic discrimination of occupational communities they belonged to, and another from the gender based discrimination in the prevailing patriarchal male dominated society. The ramifications of these hazards having direct impacts on their socio-economic and political conditions are even manifold, and have led to their general exclusion from the mainstream of the society they live in. Durga Sob, a noted Dalit woman activist, has even described the prevailing conditions as “the triple oppression” emphasizing the multiplicity of these ramifications occurring in the forms of untouchability, economic exploitation, illiteracy, low-life expectancy, political non-representation, sexual exploitation, slavery and so on. (Read more on NepaDalitInfo).

NGOs call on Member States to adopt Draft Convention on Enforced Disappearance:

Dring the National Seminar on Raising Dalit Participation in Governance: Ms. Durga Sob in her speech expressed during the first session, that the lack of participation of the Dalits, including the Terai Dalits in the governance is the main reason for the backwardness of this community. In the third session Dalit activist and Chairperson of FEDO, Ms. Durga Sob presented her paper on “Dalit Women and Reservation Policy.” In her paper, Ms. Durga Sob stated that the government ignored the problems of the Dalit women. She also said that the protective actions in favour of Dalit women could not be properly implemented. She expressed surprise as to how the Dalit population declined by 3% in the 2001 census. She concluded that since the Dalit women are triple victims from society, males and economic and social conditions, they should be given due participation at different levels through reservation. (Read this long debate about Nepal on Friedrich Ebert Stiftung).

(See National Seminar on Raising Dalit Participation in Governance.

Aziza Abdirasulova – Kyrgyzstan

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Linked with our presentation Public Fund “Kylym shamy”.

She says: “Peace and justice are the two main goals of my life.”

Aziza Abdirasulova – Kyrgyzstan

She works for the Kylym Shamy; and for the Guild of Prisoners of Conscience.

Aziza Abdirasulova (born 1958) is a well-known human rights activist who works on behalf of the citizens of the Republic of Kyrgyzstan. She is an advocate for prisoners’ rights and the right to assemble peacefully. Her activity is directed towards the fight against injustice and inequality by means of nonviolent conflict resolution. She works for the sake of justice without a personal or political agenda, and her action is based upon tolerance and transparency. She has worked with a diverse range of people in her country and has earned their trust and respect.

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Otilia Lux de Coti – Guatemala

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She is Permanent Representative of Guatemala to UNESCO Executive Council, with Portfolios in the PFII: Economic and Social Development; in Education; in Culture; and in Gender and Women’s Issues. She has a Lincence in Educational Administration.

Otilia Lux de Coti – Guatemala

The (UN) Council of the Permanent Forum of Indigenous Peoples’ ten elected, for a three-year term, the following members by acclamation, beginning on January 1, 2005:

Eduardo Aguiar de Almeida (Brazil), Yuri Boychenko (Russian Federation), Njuma Ekundanayo (Democratic Republic of the Congo), William Ralph Joey Langeveldt (South Africa), Otilia Lux de Coti (Guatemala), Ida Nicolaisen (Denmark) and Qin Xiaomei (China). (Read more here, and also here).

She says at an UN press conference on 23 May, 2003: “Indigenous participants proposed more recommendations than denouncements. The Permanent Forum has two principle challenges. The first is to make our recommendations addressed to States and cooperating agencies a reality; the representatives of the Indigenous Peoples of the world have repeatedly said they want to see themselves reflected in the policies that affect them…we all want to see the work of the Permanent Forum receive funding and support. We applaud the joint work of Indigenous Peoples, UN agencies and States.” Otilia Lux de Coti, of Maya Kiche ancestry, emphasizes the collective vision. “In twenty years we want to see this contribute to the alleviation of poverty and eliminate discrimination and move forward to building just and democratic societies.”

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Veer Munshi – Indian Kashmir

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Veer Munshi is a visual artist in exile from Kashmir valley who lives in New Delhi. He is one of the few painters in India who is able to express his anguish about his homeland through the paintbrush. At the just running Worls Social Forumin Karachi he has done a series of paintings as a reaction to human rights violations, and the turmoil that is borne of separation from his heritage.

Veer Munshi – Indian Kashmir

He talks to TerraViva, the website of the WSF 2006 in Karachi:

Q: How have the past 16 years of conflict affected the artist fraternity in Kashmir? – A: The cultural space is increasingly getting narrow and we are desperately trying to decrease that by trying to keep the cultural fibre intact.

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Sheika Lubna Al Qasimi – United Arab Emirates

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “You do not have to strip off your identity in order to achieve your goals. People should be judged for what they are and do, not the way they look.”

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Sheika Lubna Al Qasimi – United Arab Emirates

She works for the Tejari.com; the UAE Ministry of Economy & Planning (UAEMEP); and the Dubai Chamber of Commerce & Industry (DCCI).

Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi obtained a BS from California State University of Chico, and a MBA from the American University of Sharjah. She was the CEO of Tejari.com, one of the giant successful business-to-business marketplaces in the U.R.E. Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi became the first woman minister of the UAE. She has a global reputation and a well-connected network both at home and abroad. She lectures in universities worldwide, putting her emphasis on equal rights of gender. Sheikha Lubna is a role model to young women in the UAE with an inspiring charisma for young girls. (Read on the Nobel Peace Price 2005).

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Limota Goroso Giwa (Hajiya) – Nigeria

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Linked with our presentation of The Women Institute Initivative in Nigeria.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Goes with ‘Assuming Authority‘.
She says: “If you want to work with the rural women on communication issues, you have to speak their language. And their language is the language of survival.”

Limota Goroso Giwa (Hajiya) – Nigeria

She works for the International Women’s Communication Center (IWCC).

Limota Goroso Giwa, born in Ilorin, in Kwara state of Nigeria, was raised by fishing grandparents. Her father, an imam (leader for Muslim prayers), died when she was 11. She studied human rights at the University of Columbia and obtained her masters in social planning. A senior advocate on women’s rights and coordinator of women and fishery projects in riverine communities in Nigeria, she occupies several humanitarian posts, among them coordinator of the Pan-African and West African Women. In addition, Goroso Giwa addresses issues around the trafficking of Kwara women to Saudi Arabia.

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Marjana Senjak – Bosnia and Herzegovina

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Love and kindness will prove to be the successful tools of peace building. Every day thousands of ordinary people all over the world work diligently for the world to be a better place.”

She works for Medica – the Women’s Therapy Center in Zenica.

Marjana Senjak – Bosnia and Herzegovina

In August 1992, Marjana Senjak established the Center for Psychological Help in Zenica. She initiated cooperation among her professional colleagues and began working at collective refugee centers. She and her colleagues established a SOS hotline for people with war traumas, also for soldiers. In 1993, Marjana co-founded the Medica Zenica Center for treatment of women survivors of rape and people suffering from war trauma.

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Malalai Joya – Afghanistan

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Linkd with our two presentations Malalai Joya’s Historical Speech in the Loya Jirga, and The Hamoon Health Center in Afghanistan.

Malalai Joya, one of the prominent winners in Afghanistan’s landmark parliamentary elections, is an outspoken critic of the country’s warlords.

She says:”Women in Afghanistan are in exigent need of peace. I believe that once peace is achieved, they can get their full rights.” And: “I hope by being a member of parliament I will be able to serve my people, especially the women. I will do my best to stop the warlords and criminals from building any laws that will jeopardise the rights of Afghan people, especially the women.”

Malalai Joya – Afghanistan

She works for the Hamoon Health Center. And she heads the non-governmental group, “Organisation of Promoting Afghan Women’s Capabilities” (OPAWC).

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Irshad Manji – Canada & Uganda

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Linked with our presentation of an open letter from Irshad Manji.

Irshad Manji (born 1968) is a Canadian author, journalist, and activist. Manji is also a Shi’a Muslim from the Twelvers (ithna asheri) sect. She is an outspoken feminist, and critic of Islamic fundamentalism and literalist interpretations of the Qur’an. She calls herself as a rebel and a self-proclaimed Muslim Refusenik.

She was once described by The New York Times as “Osama bin Laden’s worst nightmare”. Manji was born in Uganda in 1968, but her family moved to Canada when she was four, as a result of Idi Amin exiling all South Asians from Uganda. (Read more on wikipedia).

Irshad Manji – Canada & Uganda

She writes: Friends, by now you know about the Manifesto of 12 – ‘Together Facing a New Totalitarianism’. I signed it, as did Salman Rushdie, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Taslima Nasrin and several others.

On March 11, we received a serious death threat from a chat thread on ummah.com, an Islamic website in Britain. (See more on her personal blog on March 15, 2006, and on My comment to a new fatwa.

Her book ‘The Trouble with Islam Today ‘. In it Manji describes her turbulent youth, including an incident when her father chased her around the house holding a knife. Manji holds a Bachelor’s degree in History from the University of British Columbia, and became the first humanities student to win the Governor-General’s Gold Medal for the top graduates.

In this controversial and ground-breaking book, she exposes the disturbing cornerstones of Islam as it is widely practised today: tribal insularity, repression of women, and an uncritical acceptance of the Quran. But The Trouble with Islam Today goes deeper, offering a practical vision of an Islamic reformation that empowers women, promotes respect for religious minorities, and fosters a competition of ideas. Manji’s vision revives “ijtihad,” Islam’s lost tradition of independent thinking. In that spirit, Irshad Manji travels throughout the world with her challenge for both Muslims and non-Muslims: Dare to ask questions – out loud.

Contents: Foreword by Professor Khaleel Mohammed The Letter How I Became a Muslim Refusenik Seventy Virgins? When Did We Stop Thinking? Gates and Girdles Who’s Betraying Whom? The Hidden Underbelly of Islam Operation Ijtihad In Praise of Honesty Thank God for the West Afterword Recommended Readings Acknowledgements. (ISBN 8188861022).

On this link, this book can be downloaded for free in the Arabic, Urdu, and Persian editions!

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She wants the liberal reformation of Islam through the “Project Ijtihad”:

What’s Ijtihad?

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Roger Willemsen – Germany

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Roger Willemsen, geboren 1955, beendete sein Studium mit einer Promotion über die Ästhetik Robert Musils. Nach Tätigkeiten als Übersetzer und Korrespondent hatte er 1991 seine erste eigene Fernsehsendung bei Premiere, der sich “Willemsens Woche”, “Nachtkultur mit Willemsen” und “Willemsens Musikszene” anschlossen. Außerdem veröffentlichte er mehrere Bücher, drehte und produzierte zahlreiche Filme und zeichnete verantwortlich für das “Expo”-Projekt “Welcome home. Künstler sehen Deutschland”. (Mehr bei Perlentaucher.de).

Roger Willemsen – Germany

Als Nachfolger von Daniel Cohn-Bendit und Elke Heidenreich moderiert Roger Willemsen seit dem 3.2.2004 den „Schweizer Literaturclub“. Die renommierte und älteste Literatursendung im deutschsprachigen Fernsehen wird vom Schweizer Fernsehen am ersten Dienstag des Monats um 22 Uhr 15 ausgestrahlt und von 3sat am Sonntagmorgen wiederholt. Der Moderator Willemsen ist zugleich Gastgeber und Kritiker und wird, wie jeder andere Teilnehmer, pro Sendung eine Neuerscheinung besprechen und einen Literaturtipp abgeben.

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Art Spiegelman – USA & Sweden

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First: here the image results for Art Spiegelman; and also here: Lambiek.net.

Born in Stockholm in 1948, Spiegelman rejected his parents’ aspirations for him to become a dentist, and began to study cartooning in high school and drawing professionally at age 16. He went on to study art and philosophy at Harpur College before joining the underground comics movement. As creative consultant for Topps Candy from 1965-1987, Spiegelman designed Wacky Packages, Garbage Pail Kids and other novelty items, and taught history and aesthetics of comics at the School for Visual Arts in New York from 1979-1986. In 1980, Spiegelman founded RAW, the acclaimed avant-garde comics magazine, with his wife, Francoise Mouly. His work has since been published in many periodicals, including The New Yorker, where he was a staff artist and writer from 1993-2003. He has since published a children’s book entitled Open Me… I’m A Dog, as well as the illustration accompaniment to the 1928 book The Wild Party, by Joseph Moncure March. (Read more on Pantheon Graphic Novels).

Art Spiegelman – USA & Sweden

He said: “Maus grew out of a comic strip I did in 1971 for an underground comic book: a three-page strip that was based on stories of my father’s and mother’s that I recalled being told in childhood… In 1977 I decided to do [a] longer work, [and] I set up an arrangement to see my father more often and talk to him about his experiences… Although I set about… to do a history of sorts, I’m all too aware that ultimately what I’m creating is a realistic fiction.

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Beatrice Weder di Mauro – Switzerland & Italian

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Linked with our german presentation Der Euro bringt Deutschland Vorteile.

Beatrice Weder di Mauro is a Professor of economics at the University of Mainz, a member of the German Council of Economic Experts and a research affiliate at the Center for Economic Policy Research, (CEPR) London. Previously she worked as an economist at the International Monetary Fund and at the World Bank, Washington and served on the Council of Economic Advisors of Switzerland and as a consultant for various international organizations including the International Finance Corporation, the World Bank, the IMF, the United Nations University and the OECD Development Center. She had visiting positions at Harvard University and at the United Nations University. She holds a PhD from the University of Basel.

Beatrice Weder di Mauro – Germany

Bio: born August 3, 1965, Education and Awards: University of Basel, Department of Economics, Lizentiat 1989, Ph.D., 1993, Habilitation 1999. Science Prize for Outstanding Research, University and City Council of Basel 1999.

Professional Career:

1993 – 1994: Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, University of Basel, Switzerland; 1994 – 1996: Economist International Monetary Fund, Washington D.C. ; 1996 – 1997: Economist, The World Bank, Washington D.C; 1997 – 2000: Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Basel; 2000 – 2001: Associate Professor of Economics, University of Basel; since April 2001: Professor of Economics, University of Mainz; since August 2004: Member of the German Council of Economic Experts.

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Julien Florence Mona Saroinsong – Indonesia

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Linked with our presentation of Crisis Center SAG SULUTTENG.

She says: “Humanity is universal. Do not think of only one particular group that needs to be rescued; we should try to make everybody survive.”

Julien Florence Mona Saroinsong – Indonesia

She works for the Crisis Center SAG SULUTTENG.

Julien Florence Mona Saroinsong (born 1958) is a full-time lecturer and researcher at a university in Manado, North Sulawesi, Indonesia and a volunteer at the Crisis Center of Sinode Am church network. In 2001, when thousands of refugees from violent conflicts in Poso, Central Sulawesi and Maluku poured into North Sulawesi, Mona visited refugees and used her networks as a church activist to provide them with assistance. She also trained volunteers and refugees in trauma healing and organized dialogues between conflicting religious communities in Poso and Maluku.

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Kiran Bedi – India

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: The dark labyrinths of India’s prison system would never have been exposed to sunlight had Kiran Bedi not exercised her humaneness and her unique approach to rehabilitation.

Kiran Bedi – India

She works at Tihar Prison. In 1994, she set up the India Vision Foundation, an NGO that works on prison reform, drug abuse prevention, empowerment of women, and assistance to the mentally disabled.

See also her bio on kiranbedi.com, with a video to be shown.

And see this other good bio about her.

Kiran Bedi (born 1949) is India’s best-known woman police officer. In a ferociously male bastion, she has dug in her heels, using the police service as a vehicle for social change. Kiran, with her firm footing, has been also using the police service as a medium for social change. She sees prisons and jails as an opportunity to bring criminals back to society’s fold, reversing the dehumanization for which prisons are known. She began meditation classes and education and vocational training programs for prison inmates and put in place an unprecedented democratic panchayat system in prisons.

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Orhan Pamuk – Turkey

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(Ferit) Orhan Pamuk is the author of six novels and the recipient of major Turkish and international literary awards. He is one of Europe’s most prominent novelists, and his work has been translated into more than twenty languages. He lives in Istanbul (see randomhouse.com).

(Ferit) Orhan Pamuk – Turkey

As one of Eurasia’s most prominent novelists, his work has been translated into more than forty languages. He is the recipient of major Turkish and international literary awards.

In 2005, lawyers of two Turkish professional associations brought criminal charges against Pamuk [1] after the author made a statement regarding the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1917 and the massacre of 30,000 Kurds in Anatolia. The charges were dropped on 22 January 2006. (Read more on wikipedia).

Bio: Orhan Pamuk’s Biography: He was born in Istanbul on June 7, 1952. He spent all his life in Istanbul, except three years in New York. After attending the architecture program in Istanbul Technical University for three years, he finished the Institute of Journalism at the Istanbul University. He started writing regularly in 1974.

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Sevim Arbana – Albania

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

linked with our presentation NGOs and Groups working for Albania.

Linked also to the presentation of NGO’s Protest for Women’s Rights in Albania.

She says: “Another world is possible!”

Sevim Arbana – Albania

She works for the Group ‘Useful to Albanian Women’ (UAW); and for the ‘Woman Bridge for Peace and Understanding’.

Sevim Arbana, born 1951, was one of the first activists of the democratic movement in Albania and the founder of the organization Useful to Albanian Women (UAW). She is also a human rights activist who supports groups in need and was a founder of the peace movement, Woman Bridge for Peace and Understanding, in the Balkans.

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Nina Karpachova – Ukraine

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Linked to our presentations of the Ukrainian Parliament Commission for Human Rights.

She says: “To love and protect people. To follow the dictates of my conscience and always fight for the rights of people, their honor and dignity.”

She works for the Ukrainian Parliament Commission for Human Rights; the Hope – Center for the Protection of Children’s and Women’s Rights; and the World Congress of Ukrainian Lawyers.

Nina Karpachova – Ukraine

Nina Karpachova was elected Ukrainian Parliament Commissioner for Human Rights in 1998. Her top priorities include safeguarding individual’s rights to a fair trial, freedom of speech, the rights of orphans, the disabled, people affected by HIV/AIDS, victims of Chernobyl, and persons deprived of liberty. She advocates for the rights of migrant workers and has taken action against trafficking in women. From early on, she boldly denounced torture and defended the right to peaceful assembly. She has been instrumental in bringing Ukraine to sign international rights conventions.

Nina Karpachova (48) was born into a family of lawyers. Her childhood and youth were spent in Kerch in Crimea. This ancient Greek colony, known as Panticapaeum, was once the capital of the Bosporus Kingdom. Here she attended secondary school, simultaneously studying piano at music school and gymnastics at a sports academy.

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Sobhi Hadid – Syria & France

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Sobhi Hadidi, a prominent Syrian intellectual, he writes mainly in Arab and in French, but is sometimes translated in english, by Bahjat Suleiman in the London-based Al-Quds Al-Arabi.

Sobhi Hadid – Syria & France

On April, 2005 appears one of this articles in english in Alternative Online.org, but found also on June 19, 2005 on SyriaComment.com: (with this comment: Sobhi Hadidi’s article published in the Lebanese As-safir newspaper in mid-2003 is one example where he was the first to warn of a demographic earthquake in Lebanon, should Syria withdraw its forces).

What kind of change from within does, Washington want in Syria? Any person who has been following the history of the relations between the White House and the governing regime in Damascus during the past three decades since the late Syrian president Hafez Assad launched the reformist movement at end-1970 will not be surprised by the statement released by Adam Ereli, deputy spokesman of the US State Department.

Ereli was commenting on the meeting that gathered top US state officials (Elizabeth Cheney and John Hanna) with American civil society activists of Syrian origin. He made clear that the aim of the meeting was not to study alternatives to the Bashar Assad regime but to support the Syrian people’s desire for reform, freedom, and opportunity…from within the currently prevailing system!

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Mehdi Mozaffari – Iran & Denmark

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Linked with our presentations How to go on with radical Islam, and What Is the Difference Between Islam and Islamism?, and Democracy or Islamocracy.

Mehdi Mozaffari, Professor of Islamic Studies from Iranian origin and exiled in Denmark, Department of Political Science, University of Aarhus, Denmark.

He is the author of several articles and books on Islam and Islamism. (See on this blog).

Fatwa: Violence & Discourtesy, by Mehdi Mozaffari – Iran & Denmark, Aarhus University Press, 1998, 213 pp., pbk. ISBN 87 7288 776 1

The author reveals some mysteries about Ayatollah Khomeini, the man who personally led the Islamic revolution in Iran and was consequently responsible for certain cardinal events that have dramatically influenced the entire world. Therefore, it is by no means an exaggeration to argue that the Islamic Revolution in Iran in 1979 is one of the most important political events in the second half of the twentieth century … , … the fatwa delivered by Ayatollah Khomeini on 15 February 1989, thereby sentencing Salman Rushdie to death, is the central point of the book, but it is also used by the author to explain the motives for carrying out the Islamic Revolution and the nature of the Islamic Republic. Mozaffari gives an explanation of fatwa as a specific instrument for regulation of life in Islamic societies and researches its historical origins and development. (Read the rest of this article on Aarhus University Press).

He said: “Despotism in its various forms (tribal, military, religious, and kingship) is the general and invariable trend of the Middle East. Faced with this hopless and dangerous situation, a liberal external intervention seems to be right and just. It is in this perspective that President George W. Bush’s initiative to the democratization of the greater Middle East must be situated”.

Amazon Books: Globalization and Civilizations; Authority in Islam: From Muhammad to Khomeini; Fatwa: Violence and Discourtesy; Security Politics in the Commonwealth of Independent States: Southern Belt; and others, also in different languages.

links:

Rushdie, et al.’s Manifesto … ;

No religion now;

Labour Net Austria;

Ayman Zawahiri, Not bin Laden … ;

a Danish link:

Dr.scient.pol. Mehdi Mozaffari … ;

John Grahl – England

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Linked with our german presentations of Der Euro bringt Deutschland Vorteile, and of Aufholjagd im Rückwärtsgang, and also of Euromemorandum 2005.

John Grahl has taught international economics and European integration at London Metropolitan University since 1998. Prior to that he was Reader in European Integration at Queen Mary and Westfield College. His research is centred on the political economy of advanced capitalism and takes the EU as its empirical base. Current research interests are financial change in EU countries and the financial dimension of globalisation. (See on ISET Institute for the study of European transformations).

John Grahl – England

Professor John Grahl is a distinguished academic and professor of Human Resources Management at Middlesex University. He is a member of European Economists for an Alternative Economic Policy in Europe and author of ‘European Monetary Union: Problems of Legitimacy, Development and Stability’ (Kogan Page, London, 2001), and more famously ‘After Maastricht: a Guide to European Monetary Union’ (Lawrence and Wishart, London, 1997). He has published numerous articles on economics, including in the established left wing journal ‘New Left Review’ and in the French monthly publication ‘Le Monde Diplomatique’. Previously John has been a lecturer at Queen Mary and Westfield College, and London Metropolitan University. (Read more about him on wikipedia).

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Patrick Brantlinger – USA

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Linked to our presentations of Corporate America’s New Golden Rules.

Linked also to our presentation of Alternative Globalizations.

Patrick Brantlinger – USA

Patrick Brantlinger received his B.A. from Antioch College in 1963 and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University in 1965 and 1968. He joined the English Department at IUB in 1968, and was asked to serve as Book Review Editor of the Victorian Studies journal, which he did for several years. He became Editor of Victorian Studies and Director of the Victorian Studies Graduate Program in 1980, posts he held for a decade.

From 1990 to 1994, he served as Chair of the English Department. He was a co-founder and is an adjunct faculty member of the Cultural Studies Graduate Program. He has also served as President of the Midwest Victorian Studies Association; as an elected member of the Modern Language Association Victorian Committee; as an NEH Evaluator for the Actor’s Theater of Louisville; and on the editorial boards of several journals besides VS. And he has received Woodrow Wilson, Guggenheim, and NEH fellowships.

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Konrad Paul Liessmann – Austria

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Intellectuals make us think. Thinking make us develop. So let’s go on with more intellectuals. Today with Konrad Paul Liessmann, born 1953 in Villach. He is professor at the Institute of Philosophy at the University of Vienna and the editor of Zsolnay’s PHILOSOPHICUM LECH series. He has been a journalist since 1980, and awarded by the Austrian State Prize for Cultural Journalism in 1996.

Konrad Paul Liessmann – Austria

He says: “There has been little progress in forming a common political will”. I am fascinated by the grand political experiment that is Europe. Viewed from a historical perspective, we are about to witness a further step toward the realization of a utopia that has been on people’s minds since the 17th century: the unity of Europe. However, there is a catch. Whereas everyone agreed relatively quickly about economics, about the free movement of goods and capital and with a certain delay, about the free movement of persons, I believe the political, social and historical dimension is still often largely omitted in official statements. A league of states is certainly imaginable, but a “United States of Europe” probably still remains an illusion.
At the political level, I see a definite need for action; there has been little progress in forming a common political will. Nonetheless, the European peoples’ political energy for integration will determine whether the EU becomes more than merely a fair-weather economic project. The basic mood right now is naturally euphoric, but let us not forget the issues and potential for conflict the larger Europe poses for everyone. After all, the process involves very different political developments, highly divergent historical experiences, and a diversity of cultures, religions and languages.
And we must keep in mind that after the end of Communism in Eastern and Central Europe, it was not just capitalism that triumphed, nationalism did, too. Another important factor is whether we can ease up on our previous obvious cultural orientation by the West. Can we discover the literary landscapes of the new Member States, for example, not only in the hour of their accession but in the long term as a decisive force in European culture? As regards the political dimension, we have to be clear that the larger Union creates a prosperous economic and living area with more than 400 million people. In its wake, issues of power and distribution will be revisited. Like it or not, Europe will become an international power factor, moreover, one that is in charge of atomic weapons. In pivotal terms, these facts may give rise in the near future to two political questions: How successful is European Community policy in domesticating nationalism and the interests of the nation states? And: Where should the outer borders/boundaries of the Union be drawn in the medium term and what form should they take? (see more on Magazine May 2004).

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Susan Ahmed-Böhme – Iraq

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Linked with our presentation The Iraqi Women’s League (IWL).

She says: “The rationale of my life is best expressed in what Goethe once said: ‘All theory, dear friend, is gray, but the golden tree of actual life springs ever green’.”

Susan Ahmed-Böhme – Iraq

She works for the Iraqi Women’s League (IWL).

Born in 1953 in Baghdad, Susan Ahmed is a biologist and a member of the Iraqi Women’s League. Due to her covert work on issues of ethnic and religious diversity and her opposition to the former Iraqi president, Saddam Hussein, Susan and her family faced severe persecution in Iraq. Her father was tortured and her sister was murdered.

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Maryam Namazie – Iran & UK

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Linked with our two presentations: Islam must be criticised!, and

Human beings first!

She is a Writer, International English TV producer; Director of the Worker-communist Party of Iran’s International Relations; and 2005 winner of the National Secular Society’s Secularist of the Year award.

You will find many others of her speeches, articles, campaigns, the Manifesto, her biography, on one of her blogs named Maryam Namazie.

Maryam Namazie – Iran & UK

Bio: Below is the introduction of Keith Porteous Wood, Executive Director of the National Secular Society, of Maryam Namazie during the Secularist of the Year award ceremony in October 2005.

Maryam Namazie was born in Tehran, but she left Iran with her family in 1980 after the establishment of the Islamic Republic. She then lived in India, the UK and then settled in the US where she began her university studies at the age of 17.

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Wafa Sultan – Syria & USA

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Linked to our two presentations of
WAFA SULTAN – on Al-Jazeera,

and
WAFA SULTAN – again on Al-Jazeera
.

Wafa Sultan – Syria & USA

Dr. Wafa Sultan is a psychologist and a Syrian expatriate who resides in the U.S. On June 5, 2005, she published an article on the reformist website http://www.annaqed.com/, – the Critic – entitled “The Muslim Brotherhood: Who Are They Trying to Fool?” in which she cautioned liberal opponents of the Syrian regime against believing that the Muslim Brotherhood has really adopted pluralism and democracy.

On July 26, 2005, Dr. Sultan appeared on Al-Jazeera to debate an Algerian Islamist professor of religous politics. (view this clip).

The following are excerpts from Dr. Sultan’s article on The Muslim Brotherhood: “Has Something Changed in the Basic Principles of the Muslim Brotherhood? Or is it Nothing but a Big Lie?” (Read this very long article, from Wednesday, August 03, 2005, on Syria Comment.com).

It seems there exists not any more text about her on the web, all existing links are more or less repeating about her two speaches on Al-Jazeera.

links:

The Free Copts;

flopping aces;

Islam Commentaries;


Wizbang
, and continue the discussion;

Democracy for the Middle East;

to the point;

oceanguy;

You Tube Broadcast;

Monkeyfilter;

Die Welt.

Fackson Shamenda – Zambia

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Fackson Shamenda is President of the Zambian Congress of Trade Unions, and President of the ICFTU, and also UNI-Africa Regional Secretary. On April 7, 2000, at its first meeting following the ICFTU’s 17th World Congress (Durban, South Africa), the ICFTU Executive Board elected Fackson Shamenda as the Confederation’s President.

Fackson Shamenda – Zambia

The third ICFTU President to come from a developing country, he replaces LeRoy Trotman (Barbados) and Dr P.P. Narayanan (Malaysia). He is, however, the first African trade unionist to hold the ICFTU post.
Fackson Shamenda is currently also President of the Zambia Congress of Trade Unions (ZCTU) and the Africa Regional Secretary for Union Network International (UNI).

Born in 1950, Fackson Shamenda, from Zambia, joined the trade union movement as an activist in 1971 following high school and university studies. The Posts & Telecommunication Corporation of Zambia, where he was working full time, provided him the opportunity to demonstrate his leadership qualities and in 1979 became the General Secretary of the National Union of Communication Workers.

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Sainkho Namtchylak – Russia / Siberia

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Tuvan ethno-techno, by Sarah Ankersmit – TUVAN SINGER and international diva Sainkho Namtchylak has over the last three decades won recognition for her unique fusion of central Asian throat singing techniques with modern musical forms, including avant-garde jazz and ethno-techno electronica.

Sainkho Namtchylak – Russia / Siberia

She says: I have been sharing my life with Vienna for ten years. It was not easy, it was good survival lesson after all. Good for both, or lets say, all sites of our ritual reality. How do I feel after ten years staying here?

A bit lost with midlife crises, a bit sad, a little bit sceptic, little bit lonely but generally I feel that I’m realized artistry. I’m respected as an artist. I did 30 albums at different labels with many different musicians, famous and not so. I was teaching and giving voice lessons. I was meeting a lot of people and I was learning from them too. My stile of singing and performing my voice became interated from very old traditions into our days sound. It is still a lot to learn, to know and to see. Whatever happened in this life, inner life has other dimensions – it is wider, it is wiser, just a wispered scream.

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Mohammed Farouk Auwalu – Nigeria

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Mohammed Farouk Auwalu, President People Living With AIDS in Nigeria and Yinka Jegede, a student nurse who has AIDS open up to Newswatch Magazine on their lives, HIV/AIDS and how to positively live with AIDS. He and Yinka Jegede and their organization, the Nigerian AIDS Alliance, are enabling Nigerians living with AIDS to acknowledge their illness to their families and communities, form support groups, and participate in educating a nation about their rights and needs. He is a retired soldier.

Mohammed Farouk Auwalu – Nigeria

As the first Nigerian publicly to acknowledge his HIV-positive status, Mohammed Farouk is playing a critical role in shaping the public response to the epidemic by involving people living with AIDS in policy and outreach efforts. As, while this kind of attention to the illness has taken place in other parts of the world, AIDS awareness in Nigeria and West Africa is in a nascent stage. Misconceptions and consequent cruel abuses are prevalent.

Some 5.4 million Nigerians are infected with the HIV virus, and there is potential for a rapid increase in this number according to UNAIDS. While most Nigerians know about HIV, they have not changed their behavior in ways that reduce the risk of infection. This is in large measure a result of misinformation about the illness and its causes.

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Ruth-Gaby Vermot-Mangold – Switzerland

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Nachtrag vom 1. Juli 2006: Sie ist die Initiantin des Gewaltschutzgesetzes für die ganze Schweiz. Siehe auch Gewaltschutzgesetz im Kanton Zürich, und diese Seite.

Nachtrag vom 17. Juni 2007: Brave women without photos.
Siehe auch für Deutschand: fortlaufender Text dieses Gesetzes, sowie auch diese Seite, und auf wikipedia.

Für Oesterreich, auch Frauenratgeberin.

Verbunden mit unserer englischen Präsentation They do steal children in Ukraine. Verbunden auch mit Gerechte Welthandelsregeln, und mit (Zürcher) Kantonsrat verabschiedet neues Gewaltschutzgesetz.
Sie initierte und entwickelte das 1000 Peacewoman-Projekt.

Ruth-Gaby Vermot-Mangold – Switzerland

Geboren 1941 in Solothurn. Bürgerin von Le Cerneux-Péquignot NE. Dr. phil. Ethnologin. Team- und Organisationsberaterin. Präsidentin Stiftung Contact Bern und Aids-Hilfe Bern Siehe SP-web).

Nationalrätin Kanton Bern seit dem 4. 12. 1995, Mitglied der Sozialdemokratischen Partei der Schweiz SP (siehe Parlaments-Bio).

Même en français (voir Suisse Representant).

Eufor: Redebeitrag Ruth-Gaby Vermot-Mangold Nationalrätin SP und Präsidentin der Gesellschaft für bedrohte Völker Schweiz (GfbV) – Friedenspolitisches Nein zum EUFOR-Einsatz, Medienkonferenz 13.12.2004: Wirtschaftliche und politische Entwicklung statt Schweizer Soldaten für Bosnien-Herzegowina (siehe ganze Rede bei GSoA).

Interview mit Ruth-Gaby Vermot-Mangold, Vorsitzende des Unterausschusses für Flüchtlinge der Parlamentarischen Versammlung (siehe Europarat).

Same Interview in english (see Council of Europe).

Rechte der Indigenen und Stammesgemeinschaften schützen (in reformierte Nachrichten).

Ulrich Tilgner – Germany

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He says: “The image by itself is no longer sensational—thanks to modern technology almost anybody can take pictures. But only few are able to sift through the overload of information and disinformation and explain to viewers what it is they actually see. The art is to create a bigger picture for the audience.”

He is responsable of the studio in Teheran for the 2nd german TV channel ZDF.

Ulrich Tilgner – Germany

He says during Monday Meeting in June 2004: On both sides of the conflict, the media formed an integral part of military strategy. For their part, the Iraqis attempted to exaggerate their own strength, aiming to undermine the enemy’s confidence in his own strategy while bolstering the fighting morale of their own side. Conversely, the aim of the Americans was to strike fear into the hearts of the Iraqis by demonstrating US strength and resolve, calculating that nobody is prepared to die pointlessly. On the face of it, the course and outcome of the conflict appear to vindicate the American strategy; but, according to Tilger, the limits of military logic in the absence of a post-conflict plan are also readily evident here.

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Cynthia Maung – Burma

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Linked with our presentation of The Mae Tao Clinic.

She says: “I dream of going back home to Burma one day. But until then, we need to give hope.”

Cynthia Maung – Burma

She works for the Mae Tao Clinic.

Cynthia Maung (born 1959), a trained doctor from Karen State in Burma, fled to Thailand in 1988 and set up the Mae Tao Clinic. Every year the clinic saves the lives of thousands of refugees and migrant workers. It supports remote field clinics in Burma serving internally displaced persons and sponsors women’s organizations and health education. It trains medics to provide health care throughout the Thai-Burma border. Dr. Maung has set up an orphanage, and supports schools and boarding houses.

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Tom Plate – USA

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Linked with our presentation of Tom Plate’s esterday’s article in Khaleej Times Online (a daily of the United Arab Emirates).

Also linked with our presentation on Two women and two symbols of great defiance.

Prof. Tom Plate is:

a member of the Pacific Council of International Policy, the Century Association of New York and the Phi Beta Kappa Society. He is a graduate of Amherst College and Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, with a master’s degree in public and international affairs. He is the author of five books and has been a journalist at Time, Newsday, New York Magazine and “CBS Family Week.”

Tom Plate – USA

From 1989-1995 he was Editor of the Editorial Pages of the Los Angeles Times. He has won numerous journalism awards, including the American Society of Newspaper Editors Deadline Writing Award and the Greater Los Angeles Press Club Award for “Best Editorial.” Recently, he was a Media Fellow at Stanford University and a fellow in Tokyo at the famed Foreign Press Center’s annual Asia-Pacific Media Conference. He is listed in Who’s Who in America and for the last several years has been a participant at the annual retreat of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. (Read more on Voices and Viewpoints).

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Rodolfo Stavenhagen – Mexico

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Linked to our presentations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous peoples, one and two.

Rodolfo Stavenhagen is special rapporteur on the situation of Human Rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous Peoples. Rodolfo Stavenhagen, Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people. He highlighted development projects that had impinged on indigenous rights, forcing indigenous people to move elsewhere, struggling for their cultural and economic survival. Noting that such projects had negatively affected the long-term health of indigenous peoples, and even led to violence, he added that solutions must be found for those and other issues. (See more on Dialogue between Nations).

Rodolfo Stavenhagen – Mexico

Prof. Stavenhagen was at the forefront in advancing an awareness of problems revolving around human rights, an issue about which we now hear a great deal. In fact, he was the founder and first president of the Mexican Academy of Human Rights. He served on the board of the National Commission of Human Rights and has served as a consultant to the United Nations, UNICEF, and the Inter- American Commission on Human Rights. (Read more on duke.edu).

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