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Index April 2006

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Kashi Nath Pandita – India

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Linked to our presentations of Baharistan-i-Shahi – A Chronical of Mediaeval Kashmirby, and also of Books and articles of K.N.Pandita.

Born in Baramulla in 1929 in an ordinary Kashmiri Pandit family, Kashinath Pandita did graduation from St. Joseph’s College in Arts with English literature. The tribal raid of October 1947 destroyed his family like hundreds of other Pandit families in Baramulla.

After doing M.A. from Punjab University, he served as Lecturer in State Degree Colleges and in 1958 earned a scholarship from the Indian Ministry of Education for higher studies at the University of Teheran, Iran. Four years of study and research at the University of Teheran earned him a Ph.D. in Iranian Studies meaning history and civilization of Farsi speaking peoples.

He joined Kashmir University in 1963 and it’s Centre of Central Asian Studies in 1976. He rose to become Professor and Director of this Centre till his superannuation in 1987.

Kashi Nath Pandita – India

He is not only the first Kashmiri to obtain Ph.D. from Teheran University but is also the first to have worked in close collaboration with a number of Central Asian Academies of Science particularly the Tajik Academy. From 19976 till present day, he has been visiting and interacting with Central Asian academic community almost every year or two. His travelogue titled My Tajik Friends won him Sovietland Nehru Award 1987. This work has been translated in to Russian by the Tajik Academy and is considered a valuable contribution to Indo-Tajik friendship.

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Faith Bandler – Australia

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Linked with our presentation of the Aboriginal-Australian Fellowship.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “We can change anything. We can make a just and peaceful world. History has shown that a genuine people’s movement can move more than governments. It can move mountains.”

Faith Bandler – Australia

She works for the Aboriginal-Australian Fellowship,
for the Women’s Electoral Lobby (WEL),
and for the Federal Council for the Advancement of Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders (FCAATSI).

Even as a child, Faith Bandler (86) showed the many qualities that blossomed in her later life. The abuse and exclusion she experienced as an indigenous schoolgirl in white Australia left a lasting impression on her, but she still exudes a serenity that belies her extraordinary energy for the cause of justice for indigenous peoples, for women, and for the peace movement. Indigenous Australians and Pacific Islanders have been the direct beneficiaries of her crusade. Her work for abolition of war and elimination of poverty has been of international significance, earning her several major awards.Faith Bandler (86) is best known for her leading role in the long campaign to win full citizenship rights for Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders in Australia. She has spent a lifetime campaigning for racial equality and women’s rights. Her work for abolition of war and elimination of poverty has been of national and international significance. In recognition of her efforts, Faith was awarded the Order of Australia in 1984. She received an honorary doctorate from Macquarie University for her lifetime achievements in 1994. The Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission awarded her a Human Rights Medal in 1997. Nelson Mandela presented her with an award on behalf of the Sydney Peace Foundation in 2000. Two years later, Allen and Unwin published Faith: Faith Bandler, Gentle Activist, a biography written by Professor Marilyn Lake of La Trobe University, Australia.

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Marjorie Prentice Saunders – Jamaica

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “The divine will grant women the precursory role in the fight for the peace.”

Marjorie Prentice Saunders – Jamaica

She works for the United Church.

When she was a child, she chose a great road: God. Under his guidance, she carried out marriages, funerals, baptisms, qualifying courses for women, and workshops for educating immigrants. Marjorie Prentice Saunders was the first Jamaican woman to be a Minister of the Presbyterian Church. Revolutionary in her perspective, she was never afraid of breaking traditions. She gave a lifetime of service to education and social work through community mobilization.Marjorie Prentice was born on February 25th, 1913, in Galina, St. Mary, Jamaica. One hour later, her parents took her by horse on a three mile long trip to attend the opening of the Synod of the Presbyterian Church. Since then, she has been near the Lord Jesus Christ.

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Eunice Nangueve Inacio – Angola

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Goes with ‘Assuming Authority‘.

She says: “I wish to see women free of poverty and illiteracy, bringing peace and equitable development in Angola, to see women leaders prevent armed conflict and promote inclusive, just governance.”

Eunice Nangueve Inacio – Angola

She was born in Angola in 1948 into a religious protestant family. Her background and academic pursuits did not distance Eunice from local people. In 1985, she headed the welfare program in Ministry of Social Affairs, focusing on children and war-displaced people. In 1991, she became the national director for training social workers. Through her efforts today about 600 local peace promoters have been trained and work in 14 provinces. Approximately 120 communities have been supported with local peace initiative grants to provide shelter to thousands affected by war.Eunice Nangueve Inacio was born in Angola in 1948 into a religious protestant family. But her good background and academic pursuits did not distance her from local people.

In 1985, she headed the welfare program in Ministry of Social Affairs, focusing on children and war-displaced people. In 1991, she became the national director for training social workers.

When Huambo Province was occupied and fought over by three different liberation movements, Eunice returned to her home province of Huambo and worked for British Charity, Save the Children to help displaced children and orphans whose parents had died in the war.

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David Rieff – USA

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Linked with our presentation of Cruel to be kind?.

He said: “It’s a very scary time. I think there was a lot of reason to be afraid that the post – Cold War world, the world of globalized, multinational capitalism, was going to be a lot less democratic anyway than what preceded it. And with terrorism, it seems to me the risk has now been ratcheted-up”.

He said also: “What’s happened is both on the right and the left has been a revival of this millenarian fantasy of American omnipotence. The human rights and humanitarian left thinks the United States can right all the wrongs in the world. And the hard Wilsonians, the right neoconservatives, think the United States can remake the world in its own image. Both of these things seem to me to fly in the face of history and reason. The United States is a great power, but no great power is omnipotent. That’s, again, why the human rights left scares me as much, if not more, than the Bush administration”. (Both on March 11, 2003 during the berkeley interview).

David Rieff – USA

He says about his book “Humanitarianism, the Human Rights Movement, and U.S. Foreign Policy”: … Humanitarian fills, as it were, an idealistic vacuum. Although it comes to prominence in the late sixties with the Biafran war, it really becomes an important idea in the eighties … In Europe, the great modern humanitarian movements — Doctors without Borders, Oxfam, and the like — are largely left-wing movements … and they are disenchanted. They are people who read Hannah Arendt and Solzhenitsyn. They are people for whom the God failed.

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Thakaraprambil Kochukuttan Omana – India / Kerala

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Linked to our presentation of the Rural Agency for Social & Technological Advancement RASTA.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Starting her social work at an early age, T.K. Omana has made life better for hundreds of women, writes R. Madhavan Nair (Read on The Hindu).

Omana T K (India), Tilonia and Wayanad district are hundreds of miles and cultures apart. Yet, one informed the other to the extent that Omana took economic empowerment to one of India’s poorest districts.

Thakaraprambil Kochukuttan Omana – India

She works for the Rural Agency for Social and Technological Advancement.

When she was 18 years old, Omana T K (born 1959) ran away from home to work in an NGO in Rajasthan. Returning to Kerala eight years later, she sold off all her assets to set up the Rural Agency for Social and Technological Advancement in 1989. That was the start of a veritable revolution in the villages of the backward Wayanad district; today, it has several women’s self-help groups and sees active participation by women in village-level activities. She also established a highly successful rainwater-harvesting movement.

Omana T K (born 1959) comes from an impoverished farming family in Kerala’s Pathanamthitta district. The youngest of eight children, she grew up witness to the problems of peasant women. She did what she could at a very young age, including participating in the social forums in her neighborhood. What she was certain about was that social work was to be her life’s vocation.

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Nigel Warburton – England

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He is designing and writing philosophy courses, he chairs the Start Writing programme which consists of six short online writing courses, including courses on writing fiction, plays and poetry. He is best known for his introductory Philosophy books: Philosophy: The Basics, Thinking from A to Z, Philosophy: The Classics, Philosophy: Basic Readings, Freedom: An Introduction with Readings, and The Art Question. His main research area is the aesthetics of photography, which was the subject of his PhD thesis (Cambridge, 1989) and of a number of articles.

Nigel Warburton – England

Nigel Warburton joined the Open University in 1994. He is currently working part time. He has given talks on his research in aesthetics, photography and architecture, to audiences in a wide range of institutions including Tate Modern (where he regularly teaches courses on aesthetics), Tate Britain, the Barbican Art Gallery, The Victoria and Albert Museum (Bill Brandt Centenary Conference), the Architectural Association (Ernö Goldfinger Centenary Conference), Birmingham Library, The Photographers’ Gallery and the Goldfinger House, as well as to various university Philosophy departments. He also regularly speaks to conferences of A level Philosophy and Religious students. (Read more on this article on Open Academy).

Some of Nigel Warburton’s lectures in Philosophy at the Open University:

THE BASICS OF ESSAY WRITING ROUTLEDGE (20 Jun 06), Everything you need to know;

PHILOSOPHY: THE TEXTBOOK ROUTLEDGE (Del Jun 06), Destined to be the market leader for the next generation of philosophy students;

PHILOSOPHY: THE CLASSICS (3RD EDITION) ROUTLEDGE (1 May 06). At the Open University.

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Ibn Warraq – another Muslim with a Fatwa

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Linked with the presentation of Statement by IBN WARRAQ on the World Trade Center Atrocity, and linked with the presentation of Institute for the Secularisation of Islamic Society, and the article When Ibn Warraq met Edward Said.

Linked also with My comment to a new fatwa, and with Democracy or Islamocracy, and with WAFA SULTAN.

Ibn Warraq says: “How can we expect immigrants to integrate into western society when they are at the same time being taught that the west is decadent, a den of iniquity, the source of all evil, racist, imperialist and to be despised?”

Ibn Warraq – another Muslim with a Fatwa – book see here on Amazon.com.

News on Ibn Warraq on April 2006:

See on FrontPage Magazine on April 18, 2006: An even more stringent critique is provided by the pseudonymous Ibn Warraq in ‘Why I Am Not a Muslim’, which was published in 1995, but has gained renewed attention since 9/11.[15] Raised as Muslim in a Muslim country, but now a secular humanist who admires John Stuart Mill and Friedrich Hayek, Warraq wrote this book (its title inspired, of course, by Bertrand Russells ‘Why I Am Not a Christian’) in response to the 1989 Salman Rushdie fatwa. “It is rare in one’s life,” Warraq writes, “that one has an opportunity to show on what side of an important life and death issue one stands -the Rushdie issue and the rise of Islam are two such issues and this book is my stand.” He does not pull punches: “The horrendous behavior toward women, non-Muslims, heretics, and slaves manifested in Islamic civilization was a direct consequence of the principles laid down in the Koran and developed by the Islamic jurists. Islamic law is a totalitarian theoretical construct, intended to control every aspect of an individual’s life from birth to death.” He admits that the theory has not always been put into practice -that Islamic culture, in other words, has often been less severe than the Koran prescribes -but adds that sometimes, as in the case of female circumcision, it has been more severe. “What Esposito and all Western apologists of Islam are incapable of understanding,” Warraq insists, “is that Islam is a threat, and it is a threat to thousands of Muslims.”

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Zilda Arns Neumann – Brazil

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Linked with our presentation of The ‘Pastoral’ of the Child / Pastoral da Criança – Brazil.

And linked with our presentation on Improving Children’s Environmental Health.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “When I believe in something that could benefit humanity, I go to the end.”

Zilda Arns Neumann – Brazil

She works for the Pastoral da Criança (Pastoral of the Child)

Doctor Zilda Arns Neumann (born 1943) is a pediatric and sanitary doctor. Founder and national coordinator of Pastoral of the Child, an ecumenical organism of the National Conference of Bishops of Brazil (BNCB). She is also the president of the Intersectorial Commission of Indigenous Health. Recently, she took on the coordination of the elderly. Mother of five children, she is a collector of national and international prizes, granted in recognition to her work in Pastoral of the Child.Zilda Arns Neumann (1943), a pediatric and sanitary doctor, is the founder and national coordinator of the Pastoral of the Child, an ecumenical organism of the National Conference of Bishops of Brazil (BNCB). She is also president of the Inter-sectorial Commission of Indigenous Health. Recently, she took on the coordination of programs for the elderly. A mother of five children, she is a collector of national and international prizes, granted in recognition of her work in the Pastoral of the Child.

She was born in a small community in the state of Santa Catarina, in the South of Brazil. Forquilinha was so small that everyone knew each other. It was in her childhood that Zilda Arns had the inspiration for her future: “My mom studied homemade medicine in German books. She saw people and knew who needed to go to the hospital and who could be treated at home.”

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Yael Lerer – Israel

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Linked with our presentation on The Word in Times of Crisis.

And linked with our presentation The Andalus Publishing House.

Yael Lerer publishes Arabic literature in Hebrew. Youssef Hidjazi spoke with the young Israeli about her interest in authors like Mahmoud Darwish, Mohamed Choukri and Huda Barakat, and about the difficulties she confronts as a publisher of Arabic literature in Israel. (See on Quantara.de).

Yael Lerer – Israel

She says: I learned Arabic ten years ago for political and ideological reasons, and I consider myself very lucky – it allows me to read Arabic literature and gives me special insights into Arab culture. Because of this personal experience, I decided to let others share this privilege. Once I began studying Arabic, I learned more than I had originally planned; I discovered my interest in Arabic literature and poetry and realized how foreign Arab culture had been to me before that. Even though I have had Arab friends, colleagues and comrades-in-arms for years. Four years ago I began building up a new publishing house, Al-Andalus, to publish Hebrew translations of Arabic literature. My original approach was cultural, through literature; I did not become politically active until later on. After five years working in the Israeli Parliament every day for Dr. Azmi Bishara, I simply couldn’t stand the work any more and decided to give it up. The Arab members of the Israeli Parliament are confronted with Israeli racism on a daily basis, and I found that impossible to take. (See a very long interview, conducted by Youssef Hijazi, translation from German by Isabel Coleon, with © at Qantara 2004, on Quantara.de).

Excerpt: … Yael Lerer, editor of the Andalus publishing house, Osnat Trabelsi and Prof. Avi Oz are doing all they can to contribute to the success of the project, … about creating ‘The Freedom Theater’, Mrch 5, 2006 … (go to The Freedom Theatre).

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Ghada Jamshir – Bahrain

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Ghada Jamshir says: “Brother T., this kind of marriage, this kind of behavior, diminishes the woman’s honor as a human being.” (See on Smooth Stone).

Admirers have written concerning Ghada Jamshir: “She is one feisty woman, and for some orthodox males, such forcefulness is itself a crime against ‘submission,’ so cherished in Islam. Her style is firm, aggressive, no-nonsense. This amazing woman who refuses to wear a veil, condemns lack of family planning, Sharia courts, and accuses the categorizations of ‘Islamic’ marriage as oppressive to women. “Ms. Jamshir is not a lady to be messed with, and she has nothing but contempt and derision for her critics. If only there were more like her in the Arab world”, ones said. (Read the rest of this article on The Americn Daily, Phoenix).

Ghada Jamshir – Bahrain

Excerpts: Ghada Jamshir is a Bahraini Women’s Rights Activist. She is a Muslim reformer and an ardent campaigner against the child molestation and perversion with infants which is sanctioned in Islam. Ghada Jamshir heads a women’s committee lobbying for a law that would shift jurisdiction over family and women’s affairs from Islamic Sharia court to civil courts. She has been charged with publicly defaming the Islamic judiciary court but the charge was dropped … for some orthodox males, such forcefulness is itself a crime against ‘submission,’ so cherished in Islam … if only there were more like her in the Arab world.” Read the rest on wikipedia).

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Ella-Maria Polyakova – Russian Federation

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Linked with our presentation of Soldiers’ Mothers of St. Petersburg.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “In Russia, the time has come to recognize your personal dignity. It is time to take the responsibility for your own life and the destiny of your loved ones into your own hands.”

Ella-Maria Polyakova – Russian Federation

She works for ‘Soldatskiye Matieri Sankt-Pietierburga (Soldiers’ Mothers of St. Petersburg)‘. There she works for an active advocating of human rights issues in Russia, particularly in relation to the issues facing soldiers in the Russian army. The main activities of Soldiers’ Mothers include publishing information on human rights, working with military people, publicizing the situation of soldiers in Russia and especially Chechnya. One of the principle activities of the organisation is the School of Human Rights and its programme: “We Protect Our Sons”. This programme, held twice weekly, is attended by 100-150 people per session. (See on Pax Christi International).

Ella-Maria Polyakova (born 1941) graduated from the Leningrad Institute of Communication and worked as an engineer and researcher. She is active in the field of human rights. In 1991, she was one of the Russian activists who went to Vilnius and Riga to support democracy. In autumn 1991, she created the NGO Soldatskiye Matieri Sankt-Pietierburga (Soldiers’ Mothers of St. Petersburg), which uncovers violations of soldiers’ human rights. She participates in conferences in Russia and abroad, speaking on human rights issues and advocating peace.

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Jason Morrison – USA

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Linked with our presentation of The Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Economic Globalisation.

And linked with our presentation of Economic Globalization and the Environment.

Jason Morrison is director of the Pacific Institute’s Economic Globalization and the Environment Program, where he is currently studying private sector environmental initiatives, performance-based regulatory innovation, and voluntary international standards.

Jason Morrison – USA

Since 1997, Mr. Morrison has focused on the international environmental management standards – ISO 14000. He is a member of the US Technical Advisory Group to ISO Technical Committee 207 (the body that develops the ISO 14000 standards), as well as a U.S. delegate to TC 207 on standards pertaining to ecolabeling and environmental communications. He currently serves as Chair of the ISO/TC 207 NGO Task Group.

Mr. Morrison has also been investigating the emerging use of Environmental Management Systems (EMSs) in public policy. He is a board member of the Multi-State Working Group on EMSs (MSWG), a coalition of state and federal agencies investigating the role of EMSs in performance-based regulatory innovation. He sits on the EMS Advisory Council for NSF International Strategic Registrations, Ltd. and is an Advisory Committee member of the National Biosolids Partnership EMS Initiative. Mr. Morrison holds a Master’s Degree from Boston University’s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies and a B.A. in Philosophy from the University of California, San Diego. In 1994, Mr. Morrison was a fellow with the Americans and World Affairs Fellowship Program in Berkeley, California.

In addition to working on issues relating to international environmental standards and regulatory innovation, Mr. Morrison has conducted research on the sustainable management of freshwater resources and water planning in the southwestern U.S. His past research includes work on restoration of the Salton Sea in California and binational water management in the Colorado River border region. (Read more on his website on the Pacific Institute).

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Nabeela Al-Mulla – Kuwait

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Being the first Arab woman to chair the Board of Governors of the IAEA fills me with pride and shows all women in the world that they have the chance to make the world better and safer.”

Nabeela Al-Mulla – Kuwait

Born in Kuwait, she is currently the Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary and the Permanent Representative of the State of Kuwait to the United Nations (UN), and participates in regular and special sessions of the General Assembly of the United Nations and represented Kuwait in various committees, conferences and panels. From 1977 until 1994 she served as a member of the Permanent Mission of Kuwait to the United Nations in New York where she held several posts, the last being Deputy Permanent Representative. She works also for the Board of Trustees of the American University in Kuwait (AUK).

global issues gateway with many access. Click also on the right down on ‘Multimedia lecture series’ for a video presentation. To hear Mrs Nabeela Al-Mulla speak about ‘The Role of Women in Islam’ on Nov. 17, 2004, click then on ‘lecture’.

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Izzat GHAZZAWI – Palestinian 1951 – 2003

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Linkedwith our presentation of The role of Culture in Areas of Conflict.

He writes on April 1, 1998: We need to work out a kind of art that breaks down stereotypes. He believes that the two religious extremes in Israel and Palestine are incapable of outlining the future, since the fundamentalist forces threaten the very existence of the people. He dies on April 4, 2003 in his home in Ramallah.

Izzat GHAZZAWI – Palestinian

He was born and raised on the West Bank. In 1948 Mr. Ghazzawi’s family fled to the West bank. Three years later Izzat was born into the already large family consisting of his mother and father and ten brothers and sisters. At the age of 13, Izzat Ghazzawi wrote his first play. It was a short play about a loaf of bread that was rolling in the streets. Everybody tried to catch it but nobody succeeded. He says: “you can’t choose to become a writer it is a feeling inside yourself”. In 1971 Ghazzawi graduated from the University of Amman with an MA degree in English Literature and he lectures at Beirut University. (Read more on klys.se).

BIOGRAPHY – 1951 December 4: Born in Dayr al-Ghusoun, to refugee parents. 1974: Graduates from University of Jordan with a BA in American-British literature. 1982: Graduates from University of South Dakota, USA with MA in American-British literature. Starts working as lecturer at Bir Zeit University in Palestine (at this time: Jordan, but under Israeli occupation). 1989 February: Imprisoned for political activity, in the Ashkelon prison, Beer Sheva, Israel. 1991 May: Released from prison. 1993: His son Rami is shot dead, while participating in the Intifada. 1994: Receives the International Prize for Freedom of expression in Stavanger, Norway. 1995: Is elected president of the Palestinian Writers Union. 2003 April 4: Dies in his home in Ramallah.

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Nurit Peled – Israel

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Linked with the presentations of The Suffering Palestinian Women Undergo Every Day, and of opposing, challenging and resisting 37 years of occupation.

Dr. Nurit Peled-Elhanan is the mother of Smadar Elhanan, 13 years old when killed by a suicide bomber in Jerusalem in September 1997. She writes: I have never experienced the suffering Palestinian women undergo every day, every hour, I don’t know the kind of violence that turns a woman’s life into constant hell. This daily physical and mental torture of women who are deprived of their basic human rights and needs of privacy and dignity, women whose homes are broken into at any moment of day and night, who are ordered at a gun-point to strip naked in front of strangers and their own children, whose houses are demolished, who are deprived of their livelihood and of any normal family life. This is not part of my personal ordeal. But I am a victim of violence against women insofar as violence against children is actually violence against mothers. (See on peacepalestine).

Nurit Peled – Israel

She writes: I have never experienced the suffering Palestinian women undergo every day, every hour, I don’t know the kind of violence that turns a woman’s life into constant hell. This daily physical and mental torture of women who are deprived of their basic human rights and needs of privacy and dignity, women whose homes are broken into at any moment of day and night, who are ordered at a gun-point to strip naked in front of strangers and their own children, whose houses are demolished, who are deprived of their livelihood and of any normal family life. This is not part of my personal ordeal. But I am a victim of violence against women insofar as violence against children is actually violence against mothers.

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Yasmeen Lari – Pakistan

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In addition to being one of Pakistan’s most respected architects and an advocate for preservation of historical sites, Yasmeen Lari has the distinction of being Pakistan’s first woman architect. After retiring from a career in architecture which spanned over thirty-five years, these days she is devoting her time to writing and serving as an advisor to UNESCO project, Conservation and Preservation of Lahore Fort. She is also the executive director of Heritage Foundation and the Chairperson of Karavan Initiatives, both are organizations devoted to historic preservation. (See more on Women of Pakistan).

Yasmeen Lari – Pakistan

One of the first Pakistani women architects, Yasmeen Lari is instilling a sense of civic pride and national unity by promoting awareness of cultural heritage and conservation of cultural assets among a population divided on ethnic, religious, class, and political lines in Karachi and other cities in Pakistan. Through a carefully orchestrated cultural campaign of street festivals and other educational activities, Yasmeen brings together citizens to reclaim their urban spaces and participate in activities that enable citizens and government organizations to demonstrate pride and a strong sense of belonging to their common home.

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Kenneth Deer – Mohawk Nation, Canada

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Linked with our presentation of Mohawks pass into another millennium.

Linked also with our presentation of an Indigenous Approach on Bridging the Digital Divide.

Kenneth Deer – Mohawk Nation, Canada. His Mohawk’s name is Atsenhaienton, which means “The fire still burns”.

On the Preparatory Committee of the World Summit he writes: We the Indigenous Peoples affirm our right to be part of the global information society on our own terms. However, the information society that is currently evolving has become another instrument for colonizing, assimilating and marginalizing Indigenous Peoples in a new and subtle way. We therefore emphasize that our participation in the building and implementing of the information society must be based on our right to self-determination and the recognition of our cultural diversity and distinctiveness as Indigenous Peoples.

We need to be represented with our own visions, philosophies and concepts on the conceptual framework of the information society and any action plan for its implementation. Moreover, our full and effective participation in the evolution of the information society must take place in equal partnership with its non-indigenous actors. We stress that we have the right to shape our future without the risk of losing our cultural identity. The information society and its four elements; knowledge, information, communications and ICTs, are cultural concept and expressions. Accordingly, our own culturally defined approaches, protocols, proceedings and obligations have to be respected by non-indigenous actors when implementing the information society. (KENNETH DEER, Mohawk).

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Sompop Jantraka – Thailand

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Linked with our presentation of DEPDC – Thailand.

The Shame: As the gap between rich and poor grows wider, destitute Asians are increasingly selling their most valuable property: their children. Accross Asia, tens of thousands of children from poor families are being sold into slavery, so that customers can use them as prostitutes, as laborers. Time surveys the lives of the region’s youngest victims.

Sompop Jantraka – Thailand

Their families sell them, and then SOMPOP JANTRAKA finds a life for Thailand’s army of female sex slaves. He is the founder and director of DEPDC, Development Education Programme for Daughters and Communities, which has been highlighted by the Skoll foundation in their New Heroes documentary series. The New Heroes is a PBS documentary series that will air on all national television on Tuesday, June 28th and Tuesday, July 5th. Hosted by Robert Redford, the new Heroes tell 12 dramatic stories of daring social entrepreneurs around the globe that focused on self-sustaining programs that gave long-term results for their target populations. (See the new Heroes).

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Irene Fernandez – Malaysia

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Linked with our presentation of Asia Pacific Forum on Women Law and Development APWLD – Malaysia.

Linked also with our presentation of Petition of Complaint to the National Human Rights Commission SUHAKAM.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “When I see the migrant workers’ broken bodies and eyes without hope, I want to embrace and wipe away their fears. It makes me angry and helps me to keep fighting the oppressive system.”

Irene Fernandez – Malaysia

She works for Tenaganita (Women’s Force),

and for Voice of the Malaysian People, Suaram (see the Homepage), see also this page about torture,

and also for the Asia Pacific Forum on Women Law and Development APWLD.

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Netsanet Mengistu – Ethiopia

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Linked with our presentation of PROGYNIST.

And linked with our presentation of towards helping women to fulfill their responsibilities.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Goes with ‘Assuming Authority‘.

She says: “We have to be able to gain the trust and respect of those in power and the people around us, without compromising our fundamental principles and values.”

Netsanet Mengistu – Ethiopia

She works for Progynist, and for Meklit Microcreditbank.

Netsanet Mengistu has a BA in Management and Administration. She is the founder of Progynist, an Ethiopian women’s empowerment NGO, and Meklit, a pioneering local microcredit bank. Netsanet focuses on gender discrimination. She is committed to building up and enhancing the infrastructure in the underprivileged areas in Ethiopia.

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Annelise Ebbe – Denmark

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First of all: Please read the 2006 May 24 Action Pack.

linked with our presentation of War on Iraq, and of the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “For me it is essential to always move forward from the patriarchal culture of war to my feminist culture and vision of peace.”

Annelise Ebbe – Denmark

She works for the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), also for the Women in Black Denmark, and also for the Danish Peace Council.

For 40 years, Annelise Ebbe has been actively engaged in peace work and women’s rights worldwide and in Denmark. As vice president of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), president of Danish WILPF, founder of the Danish Women in Black network, president of the Danish Peace Council, and an eager contributor to discussions on the public agenda, her continuous work and personal engagement as a pacifist and feminist has made her a well-respected and outspoken leading figure in the anti-war movement, the women’s movement as well as on the public agenda.Born in 1949, Annelise Ebbe grew up in the southern part of Denmark in a family with very progressive values. Her mother was a member of Danish Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), the organization that Annelise would head years later. Facing and fearing the potential nuclear threats of the ongoing Cold War, Annelise, at the age of 15, joined the Danish Campaign against Nuclear Weapons and thereby took her first step in a life-long engagement as a pacifist within the peace movement.

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Laurence Parisot – France

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The appointment in July 2005 of a woman, Laurence Parisot, to head the Medef, le Mouvement des Entreprises de France, the country’s leading employers’ association, was a minor revolution. Her election is the “symbol of a modernity and boldness that was not necessarily expected of France’s employers”, declared her predecessor, Ernest-Antoine Seillière; and Laurence Parisot is already flaunting her difference by her style: T-shirt and trousers, short hair, no make-up, we are a long way from the traditional “suit, tie and cigar” associated with the boss. But it is above all in her attitude that she is breaking new ground. “I define myself as a liberal,” she goes so far as to declare, when “this word has become a swearword in France”, as one boss has whispered.

Laurence Parisot – France

But Laurence Parisot is setting out “to prove that liberal does not mean antisocial” and to do it by “explaining the economy to the French”. Her credo: “When business wins, everyone wins”, and she is demanding greater flexibility in the labour market and tax cuts. “Life, health, love are insecure, why should work not be subject to the same law?”, she ventures to ask. Her formula? “What’s good is what works.” (Read the rest of this article on www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/ ).

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Luci Teresinha Choinacki – Brazil

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I see myself in each oppressed and poor woman. I do not lose hope. With will, power and union we will be able to beat sexism, conservatism, and prejudice.”

Luci Teresinha Choinacki – Brazil

She works for the Câmara dos Deputados (Chamber of Deputies)

For being a peasant, poor, and not having a diploma, Luci Teresinha Choinacki (born 1954) faced all kinds of prejudice when she was elected State Representative, in 1986, for the state of Santa Catarina. Four years later, she got to Brasilia. As a Federal Representative on her third mandate, Luci fights for women’s rights and for the land reform. She was able to obtain retirement rights and the right to maternity leave for the female peasants.

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Sakhibakhon Irgasheva – Uzbekistan

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Linked with our presentations of Business Women Association BWA, and with Microfinance in Uzbekistan.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “If people trust me, I cannot betray that trust. If they come to me for help, I must do my best to support them.”

Sakhibakhon Irgasheva – Uzbekistan

She works for the Business Women’s Association (BWA); for MEKHR; and with the Open Society Institute, Uzbekistan.

Sakhibakhon Irgasheva (born 1948) has headed the Kokand branch of the Business Women’s Association (BWA) since 1994, which provides training, advice, and support to women in developing small and medium enterprises. From 1991 to 1994, she was chairperson of Nodira, an NGO working for the protection of mothers and children. She is vice chairperson of Mekhr, a women’s forum in the Ferghana region. Sakhibakhon has played a significant role in supporting the establishment of over 60 NGOs in the Kokand area, in raising civic awareness and building civil society.
Sakhiba Irgasheva was born in 1948 into a traditional Muslim family. Her mother died when Sakhiba was eight years old and her father remarried a young girl of only 17 who could not really be a mother to Sakhiba. She witnessed scenes of family violence and early in her childhood, she swore that her life would be devoted to the protection of women’s rights.
She is now a happy wife and mother. Her son and daughter have presented her with five wonderful grandchildren. Her husband is the director of a school. All her life, Sakhiba has given help and support to those around her. She has resolved inter-ethnic conflicts in her region and protected the rights of women and children there.

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Golbarg Bashi – USA & Iran

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Linked with our presentation of Sanctioning of Iran by Iranians.

She is a Visiting Scholar, Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

She joins the statement: Censorship is obscene, not women.

Golbarg Bashi – USA & Iran

She writes: I travelled to Iran the same year that Shirin Ebadi was awarded the Noble Peace Prize and
Zahra Kazemi was murdered in the dungeons of the Islamic Republic – the year was 2003. The two women who made Iran headline news in 2003 were from the same generation of feminist activists; Shirin Ebadi participating in the Reform movement as a human rights activist and lawyer, and Zahra Kazemi as a Canada-based photographer covering demonstrations in support of the Reform movement. Ebadi, a former judge, had helped change Iranian law to grant mothers custody of their sons until the age of seven (previously it was two), and raise the minimum age of marriage to 13 for girls and 15 for boys. Kazemi was audaciously in the streets taking photographs of the newfound hope the Reform movement had installed in Iranian people, now demanding freedom and democracy, for which she was arrested and died after having been subjected to torture and rape. (Read the rest of this long text of 23 pages on ParsTimes.com).

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Probir Sikdar – Bangladesh

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Linked with our presentation of Human Rights Defenders Project – Bangladesh.

Probir Sikdar is a journalist from Faridpur writing for the Daily Janakantha. On 20 April 2001, during the time of the Awami League government, Probir Sikdar was confronted by a group of men threatening to kill him. While on his way on a motorbike to Faridpur he was stopped by few men who hurled a hand made bomb at him. These men also opened fired at him with their guns, spraying him with bullets and also attacked him with a long knife, attempting to sever his right hand. They then left the scene. He was taken to a hospital in Faridpur and from there to a hospital Dhaka. His left arm became dysfunctional from the knife attack and the doctors amputated his right leg which had been severely injured as a result of bullet wounds. He was later sent to Singapore for further treatment and, as a result, his left arm began to recover its movement. He is now using an artificial limb in place of his amputated leg.

Probir Sikdar – Bangladesh

Why: The attack on Probir Sikdar is believed to have been carried out by men hired by an alleged criminal whom Probir had written about outlining his links to a number of crimes during the liberation war in 1971. Probir also wrote a number of articles opposing terrorism, political crimes, fundamentalism, illegal activities of the government administration and law enforcement agencies of Bangladesh, which have reportedly fuelled further hostility towards him.

Legal Redress: Probir Sikdar’s brother-in-law filed a complaint with the police while Probir was receiving treatment for his critical injuries. The brother-in-law was unaware of all the circumstances of the attack so the complaint did not include the names of the likely culprits. An investigation officer met Probir Sikdar several times in Dhaka. Each time, Probir gave them the names and other information he had about the attackers. However, the names of the suspects were missing from the charge sheet.

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Lydia Cacho Ribeiro – Mexico

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Action alert ! – Linked with our presentations of Centro Integral de Atención a las Mujeres (CIAM), and of Alert for Lydia Cacho Ribeiro – Mexico. And linked with Defending Women-Defending-Rights.org

Help Protect Mexican Women’s Rights Defender: Lydia Cacho Ribeiro, president of the Women’s Assistance Center in Cancun, Mexico, was charged with criminal defamation after implicating prominent businessmen in a child pornography ring. Evidence suggests that the prosecution was initiated to silence her activism on behalf of women and children. If she is convicted, she could face up to four years in prison. Lydia Cacho Riberio is a journalist and writter.

Lydia Cacho Ribeiro – Mexico

Born Mexico City april 1963. She is the daughter of Oscar Cacho, Engineer, and the French Feminist of portuguese origins, Paulette Ribeiro, a psicollogist that worked for more than 40 years in Mexico City as a therapist and an education activist in women´s rights (died 2002).

Lydia Cacho Ribeiro has published more than 1000 news and articles in mexican newspapers and she is Editor of the gender speciallized magazine Esta Boca es Mìa. She has also published pollitical essays, together with the University of Nuevo Leon, the University of Austin, Texas and the Universite Laval in Quebec, Canada.

She published the novel “Las provincias del alma” Ed. Demac 2001. A fiction story based on a true story about a houswife with HIV who dies of AIDS in Cancun, Mexico. Recently Random House-Grijalvo published an investigative report on Child pornography and organized crime. The story of Jean Succar Kuri a lebanesse pedophile who lives in Los Angeles California.

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Mehdi Khanbaba-Tehrani – Europe & Iran

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Linked to IRANIAN PERSONALITIES ON THE ATOMIC CRISIS.

He co-signed an appeal to Iranian authorities on
July 2005 to release immediately Akbar Ganji. See also Akbar Ganji – Iran.

Excerpt: … This conference featured the participation of Ms. Leili Pourzand (Lawyer Women’s Issues researcher), Soudabeh Arghavan (Political Prisoner), Professor Sa’id Mahmoudi, Dr. Ne’mat Ahmadi (Lawyer), Dr. Khosro Shakeri and Mehdi Khanbaba Tehrani, and me. We each gave our views for twenty minutes to the members of the parliament, followed by a question and answer period … read more on Payvand’s Iran News.

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sorry, no picture available of Mehdi Khanbaba-Tehrani – Europe & Iran

See also Democracy Digest.

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Human Rights Watch writes about Iran: Legal Constraints on Free Expression: The right to free expression is enshrined in the Iranian constitution and in international human rights treaties ratified by Iran. Article 23 of the Iranian constitution holds that “the investigation of individuals’ beliefs is forbidden, and no one may be molested or taken to task simply for holding a certain belief.”177

Article 24 safeguards press freedoms.178

Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), which Iran ratified in 1975, states, “Everyone shall have the right to hold opinions without interference,” and that “everyone shall have the right to freedom of expression; this right shall include freedom to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds, regardless of frontiers, either orally, in writing or in print, in the form of art, or through any other media of his choice.”179

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Zinaida Strogalschikova – Russian Federation / Barents region

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Zinada Strogalshikova is from the Vepsy indigenous people from Russia and comes from a very humble background. Born in an indigenous setting, as a child she heard the word “education” many times and this made her try her best to go to school. She wanted to be a success and a role model to all other indigenous children in her community. She wanted to make a difference, and most of all make her family proud. She succeeded, and continued to advance her studies to the university level where she studied ethnology in the hope of discovering the indigenous peoples of Russia and helping them.

Zinaida Strogalschikova – Russian Federation / Barents region

She continues her studies and work on the traditional culture of her people, and now works in the scientific center in Carelia, her hometown. Listening to Zinaida, speaking softly but with a lot of power, you see wisdom in her. The Russian indigenous peoples are proud to work closely with her for their advancement in their territories. There are many challenges ahead, especially in that many indigenous peoples do not yet know of the establishment of the Permanent Forum and its objectives. But even the fact of its establishment is very important for indigenous peoples, especially today, when new government policies are being formulated.

map of the Barents region

another Barents region map.

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