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Index July 2006

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Dawan Chantarahassadee – Thailand

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Linked with our presentations of the Klong Dan Local Conservation Group – Thailand, and of The Assembly of the Poor AOP – Thailand.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “We must fight unwaveringly, audaciously, sincerely, with hope of nothing in return, and continue to take a clear and firm stand. There is nothing to be afraid of.”

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Dawan Chantarahassadee – Thailand

She works for the Klong Dan Local Conservation Group

Dawan Chantarahassadee graduated from the Faculty of Political Science, Ramkamhaeng University, and is hailed as “an academic among commoners of Klong Dan”. After working in a private firm, she returned to her birthplace and with her husband opened a restaurant in the community where she traces her ancestry back three generations. The turning point in her life was in 1999 when she became involved in the campaign against the corrupt Klong Dan Waste Water Treatment Project in Samut Prakarn (Klong Dan), East of Bangkok. (Read this on 1000peacewomen).

Ecxerpt: … She has peacefully struggled for the rights of women to be ordained as female monks. She was ordained as a female monk in Sri Lanka two years ago … (Read on Angkor.com).

Read ‘People’s declaration to the ADB‘.

Read ‘articles on Environmental Activism & Conservation‘.

Read ‘too hot to handle‘.

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Valentyna Dovzhenko – Ukraine

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Linked with our presentation of The Eurasia Foundation, of the The Eurasia Foundation, and of the POLITICAL SITUATION IN UKRAINE., also of Magic Reasons for Prosperity.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Never bill for your personal time, and strive to accomplish all you started.”

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Valentyna Dovzhenko – Ukraine

She works for the All-Ukrainian Charity Foundation of Hope and Good Will, and for the Union of Ukrainian Women, and also for Women for the Future.

Valentyna Dovzhenko (57) is actively engaged in public service work at national and international levels. Through governmental and non-governmental organizations, she focuses on developing strategies to resolve issues related to protecting the rights of women and children (UN Convention on the Rights of the Child), high risk groups (e.g. HIV/AIDS), poverty alleviation, violence and gender discrimination (UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women), and nonviolent conflict resolution.Valentyna Dovzhenko, 57 years old, was born in the town of Pyatykhatky, in the Dnepropetrovsk region of Ukraine. She is married and has an adult son.
Valentyna is actively engaged in public service work at both national and international levels. Through her positions on governmental and non-governmental committees and organizations, she focuses her energy on developing and effectively implementing national and United Nations (NGO) strategies to resolve issues related to numerous causes: protecting the rights of women and children (implementation of UN Convention on the Rights of the Child), and persons belonging to high risk groups (e.g. HIV/AIDS, substance abuse); poverty alleviation (humanitarian relief and social support of large and low-income families); fighting violence and gender discrimination (implementation of UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women); and assisting in nonviolent conflict resolution.

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Kundan Lal Chowdhury MD – India / Kashmir

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Linked with the articles Shirya Bhatt Mission Hospital, Jammu/India, and with ‘Of Gods, Men and Militants‘, and also with Reconciliation. Read also The Political Economy of the Kashmir Conflict.

Linked also with his 3 blogs: Blog of the Shirya Bhatt Mission Hospital, the Socio-political & Cultural Blog, his Personal & Literary Blog.

Kundan Lal Chowdhury MD – India / Kashmir.

He is Advisor of our Asian-Eurasian Human Rights Forum AEHRF.

He is a lifelong medical professional, practicing medicine since 1963, involved in teaching, research and humanitarian activities.

• Joined Medical College, Srinagar, Kashmir (India) as a faculty member and rose to the level of Professor of Medicine. Published papers in several national and international journals.

• Career as a professor of medicine cut short when forced to leave his native land of Kashmir in the wake of terrorism in 1990. The ethnic population of Kashmiri Pandits numbering more than three and a half thousand along with a few thousand of Muslims and Sikhs, was driven out from the valley of Kashmir.

• Deeply affected by the alarming rise in the incidence of various diseases and the appearance of new medical syndromes in the displaced population, founded the Displaced Doctors Association, and set up the charitable Shriya Bhat Mission Hospital for community health and welfare of the displaced population.

• Presently Medical Director, Shirya Bhatt Mission Hospital, Durga Nagar Jammu, India 180013.

• Widely known for pioneering work on The health trauma of displaced Kashmiris . Credited with drawing worldwide attention to this tragedy.

• Identified syndromes like ‘Stress Diabetes’ and ‘Psychological Syndromes in Exiled Populations’ and highlighted the adverse effects of environmental and lifestyle changes on a displaced population.

• Conducted extensive surveys in the Kashmiri Pandit Diaspora and wrote about premature menopause, reduced birthrates and rising death rates in the exiles leading to population depletion.
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• Has written extensively on various subjects – medical and scientific, social and cultural.

• Has a passion for poetry and his poems have appeared in numerous journals.

• Has to his credit two volume of published verse:
1- “Of Gods, Men and Militants” Minerva Press (India) Private. Ltd. 2000.
2- “A Thousand-Petalled garland and other poems”, Writers workshop, Calcutta, India, 2003.

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Ayorinde, or Ayo Ajayi MD – Ghana

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Linked with our presentation of Population Council’s International.

Ayorinde Ajayi is the regional director for sub-Saharan Africa. He manages seven Population Council offices (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Senegal, South Africa, and Zambia) and oversees the organization’s research portfolio in the sub-Saharan region. Ajayi’s areas of expertise are capacity building and developing culturally appropriate service-delivery models for Africa.

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Ayorinde, or Ayo Ajayi MD – Ghana

Prior to joining the Council in 1990, he was the regional vice president for the Pathfinder Fund. He has also taught and worked at Boston University and served as a government health officer in Nigeria. Ajayi has been a consultant to the US Agency for International Development, the World Health Organization, and several United Nations agencies.

Ajayi’s professional activities include serving as a board member for the Africa Health and Population Research Center, which he helped found, and as chairman of the advisory committee on access for the International Partnership for Microbicides. He completed his medical training at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, and received a masters in public health from Boston University. (Read more on this page of the Population Council).

In ‘members of the Committee of Microbicides’, see his first name written in this way: Ayo Ajayi, Population Council, Ghana.

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Swanee Hunt – USA

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Full democracy requires the full participation of women. Your voices are vital. The word ‘vital’ means necessary for life. A democracy, to be fully alive, must include all its citizens.”

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Swanee Hunt – USA

She works for the Women and Public Policy Program at the Harvard University.

See her personal website.

Read the article on Afghanistans women as leaders.

Swanee Hunt is helping to shape policies that affect women worldwide. As Ambassador in Vienna, she launched the Vital Voices Democracy Initiative and Conference, which united 320 international women leaders in business, law, and politics. The conference inspired Vital Voices of Northern Ireland, the Americas, the Baltics, Nordics, Russia, and others. Today, Vital Voices is a global partnership supporting women’s progress in building democracies, strong economies, and peace. Swanee Hunt has used her influence to connect with policymakers and dignitaries around the world. Continue Reading…

Michel Chossudovsky – Canada

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Linked with our presentation of The use of 9/11 … , and of The Center for Research on Globalisation. Also with ‘Is The U.S. Planning A Horrific Global Nuclear War? with North American Integration and the Militarization of the Arctic, and with 9/11 and the American Inquisition.

Michel Chossudovsky is a Canadian economist. He is a professor of economics at the University of Ottawa.

He says: “The evidence confirms that al-Qaeda did not play a role in 9/11. But in fact, that in itself is a red herring, because al-Qaeda is a U.S.-sponsored intelligence asset”. And: “What I’ve done in my writings is to show that the official narrative or explanation regarding 9/11 can be refuted, namely that the official narrative is a lie”.

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Michel Chossudovsky – Canada

Chossudovsky has taught as visiting professor at academic institutions in Western Europe, Latin America and Southeast Asia, has acted as economic adviser to governments of developing countries and has worked as a consultant for international organizations including the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the African Development Bank, the United Nations African Institute for Economic Development and Planning (AIEDEP), the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organisation (WHO), the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC). In 1999, Chossudovsky joined the Transnational Foundation for Peace and Future Research as an adviser.

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Luisa Morgantini – Italy

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Dialogue is the only way to end war and terror. We need practical solidarity with those who are weaker and diplomacy from below.”

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Luisa Morgantini – Italy

She works for the European Parliament; and the Confederal Group of the European United Left, and also for the Women in Black.

Homepage of Luisa Morgantini (in italian).

Luisa Morgantini is a member of the European Parliament.

The leftist politician from northern Italy supports people in areas of tension. She makes every effort to see that conflicts are resolved through peaceful dialogue.

As a trade unionist she started more than 20 years ago to establish solidarity projects in South American and African countries. Since 1982, she has been working closely with Israeli and Palestinian peace initiatives, above all Women in Black, and has risked her life in peace missions. In Palestinian areas she demonstrated with the people against the Israeli occupation.

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Maria Manuela Perreira – Timor East

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Linked with our presentation of Fokupers – Timor East.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Maria Manuela works tirelessly for the social, economic, and political rights of women against a backdrop of patriarchy, immense poverty and national reconstruction in Timor-Leste.

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Maria Manuela Perreira – Timor East

See the list of all East Timorese Grassroots Organisations & Networks (based within East Timor), Organisasi dan jaringan populer.

At age 18, Maria Manuela Perreira decided not to flee with her family to Portugal because she felt her life and commitment lay in East Timor. Since then, she has unwaveringly committed to the principles of equity, justice, and peace in a country that has experienced decades of oppression, conflict, and destruction. In a new era of independence and reconstruction, Maria Manuela shows outstanding vision and compassion as the director of a women’s organization that works tirelessly for the social, economic, and political rights of women against a backdrop of patriarchy and immense poverty.The second eldest of 11 children, Maria Manuela decided not to go with her family to Portugal in 1986 when they were fleeing Indonesian-occupied East Timor. She felt her life and responsibility lay in her home island. She returned there after studies in Yogyakarta and worked as a trainer at Bia Hula NGO, training communities in water and sanitation. She enjoyed the principles of community consultation and providing communities with the means to help themselves.

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Bjorn Lomborg – Denmark

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Linked with our presentations of The Copenhagen Consensus Center, and of the
Copenhagen Consensus 2006.

He says: “Environmentalists said Kyoto would be virtually cost-free, most countries are starting to realise that it will be very costly”.

And he says also: “Two hundred years ago, the left was an incredibly rational movement. It believed in encyclopedias, in hard facts, and in the idea that mastery of these basics would help make a better society. Since then, the world’s do-gooders have succumbed to romanticism, they’ve become more dreamy.”

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Bjorn Lomborg – Denmark

TWO years ago, a Danish environmentalist called Bjorn Lomborg had an idea. We all want to make the world a better place but, given finite resources, we should look for the most cost-effective ways of doing so. He persuaded a bunch of economists, including three Nobel laureates, to draw up a list of priorities. They found that efforts to fight malnutrition and disease would save many lives at modest expense, whereas fighting global warming would cost a colossal amount and yield distant and uncertain rewards. That conclusion upset a lot of environmentalists. This week, another man who upsets a lot of people embraced it. John Bolton, America’s ambassador to the United Nations, said that Mr Lomborg’s “Copenhagen Consensus” (see articles) provided a useful way for the world body to get its priorities straight. Too often at the UN, said Mr Bolton, “everything is a priority”. The secretary-general is charged with carrying out 9,000 mandates, he said, and when you have 9,000 priorities you have none. So, over the weekend, Mr Bolton sat down with UN diplomats from seven other countries, including China and India but no Europeans, to rank 40 ways of tackling ten global crises.

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Immanuel Wallerstein – USA

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Linked with our presentation of ‘Whom has North Korea provoked?‘, and of The Worries of the US Ambassador to Iraq, and also of Major Works by Immanuel Wallerstein.

He says: “Capitalism has been a remarkably successful system, in terms of its fundamental objectives: the endless accumulation of capital. As a consequence of doing it, it has expanded the means of production enormously. Capitalism has simultaneously been an incredibly polarising system, ever more polarising, and ever more impoverishing. Capitalism is in trouble today. It is not in trouble because there are social movements. Social movements are a consequence of the trouble. The processes it has used to accumulate capital have reached certain inbuilt limits. What we’re seeing in the world is not a sign of the success of capital, but the great difficulties of capital … “. (Read all on Al-Ahram).

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Immanuel Wallerstein – USA

See his world system theory. This text is part of the Internet Modern History Sourcebook. The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts for introductory level classes in modern European and World history.

Born in 1930 in New York, Wallerstein attended Columbia University, where he received a B.A. in 1951, an M.A. in 1954 and a Ph.D. degree in 1959, and subsequently taught until 1971, when he became professor of sociology at McGill University. As of 1976, he served as distinguished professor of sociology at Binghamton University (SUNY) until his retirement in 1999, and as head of the Fernand Braudel Center for the Study of Economies, Historical Systems and Civilization until 2005. Wallerstein held several positions as visiting professor at universities worldwide, was awarded multiple honorary titles, intermittently served as Directeur d’études associé at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris, and was president of the International Sociological Association between 1994 and 1998. Since 2000, he has been Senior research Scholar at Yale University. (Read all on wikipedia). See also: one – this disambiguation page of wikipedia, and second: – a description on the german wikipedia.

Read his text: Pax Americana, the eagle has crash landed.

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Maria Teresa Leal – Brazil

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Linked with our presentation of Coopa Roca – Brazil, and … realities about business and poverty …

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Maria Teresa Leal – Brazil

Maria Teresa Leal founded Coopa-Roca, a sewing cooperative located in Rocinha, the largest favela (slum) in Rio de Janeiro, in 1981. Nicknamed “Tetê,” Leal has a college degree in social science and a license to teach elementary school. It is unusual for a middle-class or wealthy Brazilian to set foot in a favela. But when Leal visited the favela with her housekeeper, who lived there, she saw that many poor women in the favela were skilled seamstresses — yet they had no opportunity to use their skills to generate income. So she got the idea to start a co-operative, which would recycle fabric remnants to produce attractive quilts and pillows. Gradually, as the women gained experience and developed skills in manufacturing and marketing, the work grew more professional. In the early 90s Tetê attracted interest from Rio’s fashion world, and in 1994 Coopa-Roca began producing clothes for the catwalk. In order to acquire the luxurious fabrics for high-quality designer clothes, Tetê sought out donations. She also convinced fashion designers to teach the women about production skills and trends. Coopa-Roca started getting media attention, which helped Tetê get more fabric and more contracts. Pieces produced by the co-op are unique, combining a particular type of craftsmanship originated in northern Brazil with luxe fabrics found in couture fashion. Tetê recently signed a contract with the European clothes manufacturer C&A, which she hopes will allow the co-op to expand its offerings and multiply the number of women who benefit from it. (Read more on pbs.org).

Tetê was strongly influenced early in life by three family members. Her father, a leading physician, was one of the first doctors to volunteer every Saturday in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. Her mother, a teacher, encouraged her to broaden her education to understand all of society’s ills and opportunities. Her oldest sister founded Rio’s first Arts Education School, the first school to teach education and the arts to mixed classes of wealthy, middle-class and favela children. The school, which opened in 1960 and still operates today, grew out of her sister’s civic work.

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Antonio Jacanamijoy – Colombia

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Linked with our presentation of COICA Coordinadora de las Organizaciones Indigenas de la Cuenca Amazonica.

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Antonio Jacanamijoy – Colombia

Antonio is from Colombiaâs Sibundoy Valley. He has a university degree, is married and has three children. Antonio speaks Spanish and Quechua. Antonioâs interests, concerns, and experiences are in indigenous rights, human rights, economic development, natural resource protection, biodiversity, and intellectual property rights. Antonio began working in his local community in the Colombian Amazon from which he rose to Colombian regional and national levels, and then on to such international arenas as the United Nations, the World Bank, OXFAM, and the Climate Alliance (Germany).

In each case, he has taken a leadership role that encourages and enables the sort of open dialogue and negotiation that, breaking with Latin Americaâs traditional hierarchies, moves toward participatory and deliberative democracy. Antonio assumed his first official leadership role as governor of the Colombian Inga Indigenous Community in 1987. From this position, he gained more powerful roles as he represented the interests of his community at increasingly wider regional and national levels. His representation of indigenous interests extended internationally when he assumed coordinating positions for Amazon basin indigenous groups in Ecuador and became a member of the directorate for the Forest Stewardship Council in Oaxaca, Mexico.

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Salima Hashmi – Pakistan

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Dean, School of Visual Arts, Beaconhouse National University, Lahore, Professor Salima Hashmi is a painter, art educationist, writer and curator. She was educated at the National College of Arts (NCA), Lahore, the Bath Academy of Art, U.K., and the Rhode Island School of Design, USA. She taught for 30 years at NCA, Pakistan’s premier art institution, and retired as its Principal. She has exhibited her own work, travelled and lectured extensively all over the world, and has curated about a dozen international art shows in the U.K., Europe, the USA, Australia, Japan and India. She is a recipient of The President’s Award for Pride of Performance, Pakistan. (southasiafoundation).

She says: “The objective of art is to give life a shape and though artists cannot change the world they can, through their work, give flight to imagination, they can give you the direction”.

She says also: “You don’t understand the singing of birds but that does not mean it has no meaning. Similarly, if you watch it closely, your eyes start talking to the works of art”.

Salima Hashmi – Pakistan

Excerpt: … Last year, Salima Hashmi published a book titled Unveiling the Visible: Lives and Works of Women Artists of Pakistan. The book examines the lives and works of about 50 of Pakistan’s women painters since independence. As Murataza Rizvi wrote in his review of Salima’s book in Dawn, 09/2202, “She took to writing (the book) only because our writers had failed to document the history of Pakistan’s women artists.”

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Katrin Rohde – Burkina Faso & Germany

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Linked with our presentations of Managré Nooma – Burkina Faso, and of Dialog der Kulturen.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “What is good is never in vain. All thoughtful women working under extreme conditions will confirm this thanks to their daily encouraging experiences. Indeed, what is good is never in vain.”

Katrin Rohde – Burkina Faso & Germany

She works for ‘Managré Nooma’, (What is good is never in vain).

Born 1948 in Hamburg, Germany, Katrin Rohde is recognized in the “country of the upright men” (Burkina Faso) for the foundation of an orphanage for boys in 1996, for girls in 1998, for a home for streetboys and for the foundation of an infirmary for people in need in 1997, for establishing a home for young HIV-infected mothers in 2002, and for producing short-films on the subject of unwed teenage mothers and trafficking of children. Katrin Rohde succeeded in giving a home to about 60 boys between the ages of six and eighteen. All live in a family structure and receive clothing, meals and money for school.

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Anonyma – International

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Linked with our presentation of les femmes et la Commune.

She (Anonyma) is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

One of these Anonyma says: “Even if they made me a gift of a better world, I would refuse it. My home is with those who have no rights – women, children, and men.”

Anonyma – International

Her work: She may be a farmer battling for access to land and clean water. She may be a scientist who publicizes abuses, organizes peace watches and faces threats to her life.

Anonyma is her name – she represents all the women we were not able to reach, or whose names we could not publish for fear of jeopardizing their work. Anonyma may belong to a marginalized minority group. She makes violence and its mechanisms visible to others. Anonyma is a name synonymous with courage, peaceful action and the future. Whoever she is, and wherever she is, she lives in a world in which working for peace is dangerous.

Anonyma’s life stories differ widely:

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Stanislavka Zajovic – Serbia and (now independent) Montenegro

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Linked to our presentation of Women in Black, and of March across the Nullarbor, and of WLUML – A Different Kind Of Power Is Possible.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Peace is the ability to create space for listening to the stories of the many who are embittered and even hateful.”

Stanislavka Zajovic – Serbia and (now independent) Montenegro

She works for the Women in Black; and for the Women’s Peace Network against War.

Even before the war, Stanislavka Zajovic was actively involved in the first feminist initiatives in former Yugoslavia. When war broke out, Stanislavka, together with others, founded Women in Black (inspired by the Women in Black of Israel and Palestine). From October 1991 until the war ended, Women in Black organized weekly peace demonstrations in Belgrade and across Serbia and Montenegro: in silence and dressed in black, they condemned the war and crimes committed falsely in the name of the interests of the Serbian nation.

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Chahla Beski-Chafiq – Iran & France

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Linked with our presentation of … the role of islam in politics ….

Also linked with Ibn Warraq – another Muslim with a Fatwa, of Akbar Ganji – Iran, of Mehdi Mozaffari – Iran & Denmark, of Mehdi Khanbaba-Tehrani – Europe & Iran, of Wafa Sultan – Syria & USA, of Ayaan Hirsi Ali – Somalia & Netherlands, of Taslima Nasreen – Bangladesh, on of many other couragieous women and men, to be found on this or any other blog by the links there.

Chahla BESKI-CHAFIQ, sociologue, éxilée politique d’origine iranienne et sociologue de formation, elle est responsable de formation

Stella Cornelius – Australia

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Linked with our presentations of The Sydney Peace Foundation, of the Conflict Resolution Network, and of the Australian Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “How many are needed to make a world of peace, justice, and human rights? Just one more, you! Strength comes from kindness and concern for future generations, not from waging war and military might.”

Stella Cornelius (left) – Australia.

On 4 September 2000 former president of South Africa, Nelson Mandela, presented Dr Stella Cornelius, founder of the Conflict Resolution Network, and Faith Bandler, campaigner for indigenous rights in Australia, with certificates for their dedication and achievements in conflict resolution and education. The Sydney Peace Foundation was proud to have such an honoured guest. (Read more on this link of the Sydney Peace Foundation).

She works for the Conflict Resolution Network (CRN); for the United Nations Association of Australia (UNAA); and for the Australian Center for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Queensland.

Born in 1919, Australian Stella Cornelius has devoted a lifetime to peace, conflict resolution, and social justice issues. Her unique contribution to global peace has been to make access to conflict resolution training widely available. These skills are now used in workplaces, universities, schools, community organizations, and by individuals. For her lifelong community and peace work, Stella was awarded the Order of the British Empire (1979), Order of Australia (1987), and an honorary Doctor of Letters (1999). She is acknowledged as a Peace Messenger of the United Nations.

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Eva Hoffmann – USA-Canada-Poland

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Linked with our presentation of Boycott against civil conduct.

She said (excerpt): … the sense of geographical topsy-turviness was the most concrete expression of displacement. Of course when I was growing up in Poland, I thought that Poland was the very center of the world, as we all do when we grow up in a place. And that the world existed in relation to it. All of a sudden, I was in Vancouver, and Canada, North America, was the center of the world and Poland was on the periphery and very far away. And that of course, corresponded, [was] a kind of objective correlative, the most concrete symbol of the many cultural displacements that went along with it, the many sorts of cultural values that changed as I went from Poland to Canada. Our cultural values, both on the largest and on the smallest scale in the sense of, say, political outlook or world view or the social set-up; too, notions of human intimacy or beauty or the distances at which we stand from each other, etc., etc. … every cultural value sort of did a flip or sort of moved … (Read more on this page of berkeley interview).

Eva Hoffmann – USA-Canada-Poland

“It is only through the efforts of imagination and memory that the shadows can be made to speak,” writes Eva Hoffman. Her memoir, LOST IN TRANSLATION follows her journey from Cold War Poland to Canada, and later, Texas, as she grapples with language, identity, and alienation. In her more recent books, SHETL and AFTER SUCH KNOWLEDGE, she examines life before and after the Holocaust, and the complexities of remembrance. A former editor for the NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS, Hoffman currently teaches at MIT. (Read on Films42.com).

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Paddy Walker – Cook Islands

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Linked with our presentations of PPSEAWA International, and of Comments by Padddy Walker.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Paddy Walker’s passion has always been to generate new ideas about peace so that people can become peace builders of a “world fit for children.”

She says:

Paddy Walker – Cook Islands

She works for the Pan-Pacific and South East Asia Women’s Association (PPSEAWA).

Paddy Walker (87) has been driven all her life by a passion to achieve lasting peace in the world around her. She founded Pacifica (1974) to help Pacific Islander immigrants adjust to life in New Zealand. It was her initiative to develop the PPSEAWA Peace Gardens that have been established in Malaysia, Singapore, Samoa, and the Cook Islands; Fiji’s Peace Garden is now being developed. Paddy works tirelessly with youths. Her vision is to generate new ideas about peace.

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Oronto Douglas – Nigeria

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Linked with our publications of Nigeria’s Oil and the population, and with Environemental Rights Action ERA – Nigeria, and
SEEN – Sustainble Energy & Economic Network. Also with The World Bank’s Recipe for Climate Disaster.

He says (excerpt): ” … So we need to discuss, and in discussion, the issues we have raised must be analyzed. We have called [for] and we are demanding resource control. When we talk about resource control, we mean that we want to be in control of the air that we breathe. We don’t want to breathe polluted air. We want to be in control of the forests and the land, where the wildlife and the rain forest bring forth life. We want to protect the waters. We don’t want those waters polluted; they are our vital resources. Oil and gas are temporary resources that could evaporate, that could go away over a given period. It is not a key issue, say, over a thousand years. Because we are going to be there for many more years than that! We have been there for more than 10,000, 20,000 years, as human memory can remember, and there is a possibility that we will remain there for more thousands and thousands of years. But oil is very temporary. When it’s finished, it is finished. But the people, the land, the environment, will remain. The challenge is: what is going to be left to be integrated? An impoverished land that after 2,000 years cannot be healed, or what? These are our legitimate worries. We are calling for resource control by our people” … (Read all on this page of Berkely interview of 2001).

Oronto Douglas – Nigeria

He is a human rights attorney and environmental activist. He is Deputy Director of the Environmental Rights Action Group in Nigeria.

Read the text on ERA of May 02, 2006.

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Amsatou Sow Sidibé – Senegal

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Linked with our presentation of the Fondation pour l’innovation politique, and RAFET – Senegal, and also Finding the Law: Islamic Law.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Goes with ‘Assuming Authority‘.

She says: “Nothing lasting can be built without peace.”

Amsatou Sow Sidibé – Senegal

She works for the ‘Réseau Africain pour la Promotion de la Femme Travailleuse’ RAFET.

First/d’abord: Amsatou Sow Sidibe, professeur à l’Université de Dakar et membre correspondant de la Fondation pour l’innovation politique, revient sur les récents débats sur l’immigration en France et leur perception en Afrique subsaharienne / about immigration, listen to her video-interview – in french / interview en français. Téléchargez la vidéo (format mp4).

Amsatou Amsatou Sow Sidibé (52) has a doctorate in law and political science from the Université Paris II. She is a full professor and holds the Chair of Private Law at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) in Dakar; she also heads the university’s Institute for Human Rights and Peace.

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Jessica García – Honduras

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Linked with our presentations of The Garifunda Community – Honduras, and with Garífuna Community Leader in Honduras Threatened with Death.

An Afro-descendent community leader in Honduras, Jessica Garcia, was forced at gunpoint to sign a document surrendering land and rights to a powerful real estate company. After refusing to accept a bribe to endorse the document, a representative of the company threatened to kill Ms. Garcia, the leader of the San Juan Tela Patronato, which represents the interests of the San Juan Garifuna community, and to murder her children.

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Sorry, I can not find any photo of Jessica García, Honduras (see also my comment ‘Brave women without photos‘).

This incident is only the most recent in a series of mounting threats and violent attacks faced by the Garifuna community and their leaders over the last several years. Powerful business interests, who seek to benefit from developing Garifuna territory into major tourism projects, engage in intimidation and violence, with virtual impunity. (Read more on action.humanrightsfirst.org).

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english links:

rights action.org; and Brandeis panel and HR;

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spanish links:

article on conexihon.com, and homepage of conexihon.com;

this case on UNHCR;

Prensa indigena.org;

rds.hn;

RESOLUCIÓN DE LA CORTE INTERAMERICANA DE DERECHOS HUMANOS DE 21 DE SEPTIEMBRE DE 2005; and same also on cortheidh.org.

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“Rosenthal quiere quedarse con todo Nuevo San Juan” (Marzo 2006):

Defender sus tierras hasta con sangre es la decisión de los pobladores de la aldea garífuna de San Juan, quienes argumentan que no están invadiendo nada porque los terrenos son suyos.

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Rosalina Tuyuc Velásquez – Guatemala

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Linked with our presentation of Conavigua, the ‘Coordinadora Nacional de Viudas de Guatemala’. And linked with our Humanitarian Text: ‘Linking Gender, Food Security and the Environment‘.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “”In order to guarantee the achievement of food security, it is necessary to combat the current disparities, since there are a lot of people who get sick or die because they eat a lot, and on the other hand there are millions who die because they do not have enough food.” (see FAO.org, 2002).

She says also: “My place will always be at the side of the widows, the women who carry the weight of racism on their shoulders.”

Rosalina Tuyuc Velásquez – Guatemala

She works for Conavigua, Coordinadora Nacional de Viudas de Guatemala.

Rosalina Tuyuc Velásquez (49) belongs to the Maya-Kaqchikel ethnic group. Orphan, wife, mother and widow, displaced and persecuted. She fights so that the Guatemalan State will admit its responsibility for the arrest, disappearance and death of thousands of Guatemalan people. She tries to overcome her terror and embraces life. She demands justice, dreams of peace, respect towards women, the well being of the indigenous people.Rosalina Tuyuc Velásquez is “a woman of maize, oak and fire. A member of the Maya-Kaqchikel ethnic group, she speaks Spanish and Kiché. She belongs to a religious agricultural family. She lives with the spirituality of the Mayans “thanks to the wisdom of the elders”.

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Howard Zinn – USA

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Linked with our presentations of ‘ Lié aussi avec notre présdentation en français d’attac france. And also with another Communication is possible.  Added Jan. 26, 2008: He is a better world heroe.

He says: (Excerpt of an interview, 2001): … ” … Historians must not be sweet. But optimistic … well, yes, a cautious optimism. Cautious in the sense that I’m not positive that things are going to go well. The future is indeterminate. But after all, the future depends on what we do now. If we are pessimistic now, we are doomed in the future. If we give up at this point then we know nothing good is going to happen. If we act on the assumption that there’s a chance that something good may happen, then we have a possibility. Not a certainty, but a possibility. So I believe it’s useful, it’s pragmatic to be optimistic. But not only that, not simply an act of faith, but also because there is historical evidence for the fact that when people act, persist, get together, organize, they bring about changes. There haven’t been enough changes. So you can look at that and say, not enough. True. But the fact that some changes have been made. The fact that labor, by struggling, won the eight-hour day. The fact that blacks in the South did away with the signs of segregation. The fact that women changed the consciousness of this country about sexual equality. Even though those are only beginnings, that historical experience suggests reason to think it is possible that other things may change … “. (Read the whole very long interview on berkeley.edu).

Howard Zinn – USA

Kate Daniels interviews Howard Zinn, author of “Original Zinn: Conversations on History and Politics,” on “Sunday Morning Magazine”, July 09, 2006, at 5:30 a.m., on (US) KRWM-FM (106.9). (See on Radio: 60s rock powerhouse KJR-AM.

Howard Zinn (born August 24, 1922) is an American historian and political scientist. His philosophy incorporates ideas from Marxism, anarchism, socialism, and social democracy. Since the 1960s, he has been an important figure in the Civil Rights and anti-war movements in the United States. Author of 20 books, including the popular A People’s History of the United States, Zinn is Professor Emeritus in the Political Science Department at Boston University. For 50 years, he has campaigned against the killing of civilians in time of war. (Read more, and the rest of his biography, on wikipedia).

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Aïssata Kane – Mauritania

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Linked with our NGO presentations of ‘L’APEM – Mauritanie‘, and of ‘A.D.D.F.E. – Mauritanie‘, and also of ‘AIFF / APEM – Mauritanie‘. And also linked with our presentation of the Humanitarian Text ‘Mauritania: Low HIV prevalence, widespread AIDS stigma‘, and with Economy of Mauritania.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Goes with ‘Assuming Authority‘.

She says: “Old age should not hinder women from helping to build their country, rather it should be seen as an asset because of all the experience that comes with it.”

Aïssata Kane – Mauritania

She works for the ‘Association pour la Protection de l’Environnement en Mauritanie (APEM)‘, and for the ‘Association Mauritanienne pour la Protection de l’Enfant et de la Femme‘, and also for the ‘Association Internationale des Femmes Francophones’.

Read some texts out of different Google Groups: Mauritania gets to grips with Aids education (March 2005); again about AIDS (February 2006); also on ‘les inégalités entre les sexes‘ (Juin 2005); and ‘sommet interréligieux sur la paix en Afrique‘ (Avril 2006); and also ‘APPEL POUR LE CHANGEMENT EN MAURITANIE‘ (Juin 2005).

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Sir Bill Morris – England

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Linked with our presentations of TGWU – England, and with Migrant workers ‘boost UK growth’. See also Remembering British Unions.

He says: “I’m not sure that it [is] at the moment, given the march to mega-unions and mega-mergers”, and: “I’ve watched the last two Labour Party conferences and the debate, and it seems to me that trade unions have an agenda not to promote some of the policy issues, but merely to defeat the government, defeat the platform”. (See on BBCnews, June 9, 2006).

Sir Bill Morris – England

Excerpt: … A delegation from Jamaica attended, headed by Senator Delano Franklin, Minister of State for Diaspora Affairs, along with Mr Ed Bartlett, representing the Jamaica Labour Party. The keynote address was given by Sir Bill Morris, Chancellor of UTech and a champion of the diaspora in the UK. It was an inspiring gathering of Jamaicans, eager to stand up and be counted … (see on the Jamaica Observer, June 12, 2006).

Excerpt: … Sir Bill Morris, the former union leader who headed an inquiry into professional standards in the Metropolitan Police, said it was essential that armed officers who were asked to confront suicide bombers should be confident that they had public support. Sir Bill Morris: ‘This is detracting from the fight against terrorism’ He denounced the squabbling that followed the leak of confidential witness statements gathered for the investigation being conducted by
the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) … (Read all on Google Group uk.politics.misc).

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Anica Mikus Kos – Slovenia

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Linked with our presentation of The Medical Network for Social Reconstruction in the Former Yugoslavia, and of The Scope and Benefits of Youth Volunteering.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “The role of mental health professionals in war-related situations is to transfer knowledge and experience to parents, teachers, and others who are working to improve the quality of a child’s life.”

Anica Mikus Kos – Slovenia

She works for the Foundation “Together,” a Regional Center for the Psychosocial Well-Being of Children.

Read first this text about Community based approaches to mental health protection in the post war situation from Anica Mikus Kos.

Read also Case Study: Therapeutic Activities in Schools for Refugee Children in Slovenia (1992-1995).

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Blanca Campoverde – Ecuador

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Linked with our presentation of the Fundacion Ninez y Vida, and linked with our presentation of Ecuador’s NGOs.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “We can only contribute to the peace in the world with human qualities.”

Blanca Campoverde – Ecuador

She works for the ‘Fundación Niñez y Vida–Tierra de Hombres Ecuador‘.

This year, she will complete 50 years of life. Thirty of them were spent educating the children of underprivileged classes. Blanca Campoverde, early orphan and adolescent mother, came from a poor family. Now she is one of the most important figures in the education sector in her country. She directs the Fundación Niñez y Vida (Childhood and Life Foundation), an organization that takes care of the education and health of children and youth.“Blanca is a very special person with a great intelligence. She has taught herself so well that people even ask her in what university she has studied. And she is so dynamic that Edmond Kaiser, the founder of the non-governmental organization Tierra de Hombres (Terre des Hommes), immediately accepted her application and made her director of the day care center he founded in Quito.”, says Florence de Goumoëns, a Swiss educator, about the Ecuadorian educator Blanca Campoverde.

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Margarita Assenova – USA & Bulgaria

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Margarita Assenova is a political analyst and journalist, who served as a research consultant for the CSIS Eastern Europe Project.

Margarita Assenova – USA & Bulgaria

Read this interview on ngoCHR about the theme The Commission is too soft on dictatorships.

Accompanying human rights activists to protect them from danger Liam Mahony, Peace Brigades International, USA Peace Brigades International (PBI) sends international observers to accompany human rights activists who are threatened by the government or paramilitary organizations. They serve as a reminder to perpetrators of human rights abuse that the international community is watching. In the event of an abduction, the observer alerts authorities in the country, their own native government and activists around the world. This brings the influence of the foreigner’s government and international contacts to bear on the perpetrators. Although the volunteers are the most visible symbol of the accompaniment tactic, the success of the approach depends on an international awareness of the situation through an extensive support network of concerned individuals and supporting organizations. This network is ready to apply special pressure in crisis situations involving PBI volunteers and the people they are protecting. Through e-mails, faxes and letters sent to authorities in the country in which the crisis is occurring, the recipients are made aware that the eyes of the international community are upon them. In selective situations, PBI also uses a high-level alert network of influential political and diplomatic authorities when it wishes to apply potent pressure. These are people who have especially strong influence on the government authorities in the country concerned. Margarita Assenova is one of them. (Read more on NewTactics).

Read her article Educating the European Way.

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Irene Morada Santiago – Philippines

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed fort the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “A just peace is not achievable, nor is it sustainable without the energies, dreams, imagination and inspiration of women.”

Irene Morada Santiago – Philippines

She works for the Mindanao Commission on Women; the Mothers for Peace Movement; and the Institute for Women’s Leadership.

For 30 years, Irene Morada Santiago has been at the forefront of efforts to improve the status of women in the Philippines and the world. Starting as a grassroots organizer of minority Muslim women in southern Philippines, she has worked on issues of poverty, peace and conflict, politics and governance, empowering women so they are taken seriously and are placed in major decision-making positions. She was the executive director of the highly successful NGO Forum on Women 1995 in China, which will be remembered for its impact on the issues that confronted women at the end of the 20th century. Irene Morada Santiago still remembers the day two drunken soldiers broke into the seminar hall and opened fire with their M-16 rifles. In front of her, about 20 women and 23 children cowered for safety, terrified. “I had never seen so many scared women and children in my life,” says Irene. “And I felt responsible.” It was in the mid-1970s and at the height of the secessionist rebellion waged by the Moro National Liberation Front against the Philippine government. Martial law had been declared in 1972.

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