Your Search Results

Index January 2007

Comment first! »

Pekka Himanen – Finland

Comment first! »

Linked with Global Dignity.org., and with ‘A global dream‘.

Read: CORRECTING and REPLACING – Young Global Leaders Promote Global Dignity; ”Dignity Day in Davos” Precedes World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2007, (January 24, 2007): … Global Dignity GD is an initiative founded by YGLs HRH Crown Prince Haakon Magnus of Norway; Pekka Himanen, Professor of Philosophy, University of Art and Design Helsinki and Visiting Professor, Oxford University; and “Silver Rights” movement activist and Operation HOPE, Founder, Chairman and CEO, John Hope Bryant last year during the WEF Annual Meeting 2006. A dozen YGLs will also visit local classrooms to promote “Dignity Day in Davos” activities … (full text).

Pekka Himanen - Finland two redim90p.jpg

Pekka Himanen – Finland

He is born October 19, 1973, and is today a Finnish philosopher.

He says (about the NetAcademy Model): Two excerpts: … “I’m involved in the virtual university things in many ways. Last year I wrote the virtual university’s paper for the Minister of Education in Finland. And at the end of the last year, the Finnish government decided to partly fund a virtual university as a collaboration of the universities and companies.

Continue Reading…

Tetyana Tkachenko – Ukraine

Comment first! »

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I always tell my students: Think! Look for peace and beauty everywhere. If you find peace in your soul, if you see the beauty in the world around you, you will be free! I want them to realize that money alone cannot buy happiness. I want them to open the door to something more important, their hearts”.

She says also: “It was not easy at first, so we decided to work out our own democratic rules: togetherness, friendliness, fairness, happiness, empathy and self-esteem. Which in the long run resulted in WE-NESS. We are human beings first, we said, we are boys and girls or other members of the society only secondly”.

And she says: “My life was cut into two parts in April 1986, in BEFORE and in AFTER”.
0628 redim 60p.jpg

Tetyana Tkachenko – Ukraine

She works for Women for the Future / Žinky za Majbutnie. This is a political party in the Ukraine. At the last legislative elections, 30 march 2002, the party won 2.1 % of the popular vote and no seats. At the last legislative elections, 26 March 2006, the party was part of the Opposition Bloc “Ne Tak“.

When the nuclear catastrophe took place, it opened her eyes and changed her life. Working in the contaminated area for five years she developed a new child-centered holistic education for peace, democracy, and ecology. Her goal was to save the children and to work for a better world.

Continue Reading…

Scott Ritter – USA

Comment first! »

Linked with Stop The Iran War Before It Starts.

He says: ”I have never given Iraq a clean bill of health! Never! Never! I’ve said that no one has backed up any allegations that Iraq has reconstituted WMD capability with anything that remotely resembles substantive fact. To say that Saddam’s doing it is in total disregard to the fact that if he gets caught he’s a dead man and he knows it. Deterrence has been adequate in the absence of inspectors but this is not a situation that can succeed in the long term. In the long term you have to get inspectors back in”. (full text).

William Scott Ritter, Jr. (born July 15, 1961) is most noted for being a critic of United States foreign policy in the Middle East stemming from his experiences as a United Nations weapons inspector in Iraq. Prior to the US invasion of Iraq in March, 2003, Ritter repeatedly stated that Iraq possessed no weapons of mass destruction (WMDs). Because of the prevailing political climate in the United States at the time, Ritter was widely condemned for this position. In retrospect, much of Ritter’s pre-invasion critique of US policy has been vindicated. (wikipedia).

Listen to this video: BACK FROM IRAQ, The US Soldier Speaks.

Listen to the many audios: through Soundpress.

Scott Ritter - USA two.jpg

Scott Ritter – USA

Read: The Scott Ritter’s Archive.

Listen to: Scott Ritter on “Target Iran: The Truth About the White House’s Plans for Regime Change”, October 16th, 2006 on Democracy Now.

Military background: Ritter was born into a military family in 1961. He graduated from Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, with a Bachelor of Arts in the history of the Soviet Union and departmental honors. He was first in the U.S. Army serving as a Private in 1980.

Continue Reading…

Tecla Wanjala – Kenja

Comment first! »

Linked with .

See also the WSF World Social Forum 2007, Kenya.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “In war everybody is a victim. For one to reconcile communities, one needs to rise from being a wounded victim to a wounded healer. I am a wounded healer”. And: “I don’t want my children to suffer the way I saw others suffering”.

She says also: “You wouldn’t think that, for example, Indonesia and Kenya have so much in common. Do you think that people who are refugees or maybe practitioners, if they heard stories from other communities that have begun to process and heal, it would help them to process and heal? It is interesting how healing stories themselves are, no?”.

And she says: “I have committed my life to peace building. To reconcile communities, one needs to rise from being a wounded victim to a wounded healer. I am a wounded healer”.

Tecla Wanjala - Kenja two redim70p.jpg

Tecla Wanjala – Kenja

She works for the Japan International Cooperation Agency JICA, for the Peace and Development Network of the NGO Council PeaceNet, and for the Coalition for Peace in Africa COPA.

Tecla Wanjala, a Kenyan 43-year-old mother of four, has dedicated her work to peace building. The trained social worker holds a master’s degree in conflict resolution. She started working with refugees in 1991 and later with internally displaced persons in her home district in Western Kenya. She initiated reconciliation meetings between opposing ethnic groups. Today, she works on peace building and post-conflict reconstruction from community to national level.

Continue Reading…

Meaza Ashenafi – Ethiopia

Comment first! »

Linked with The Ethiopian Women Lawyers Association EWLA.

See also the WSF World Social Forum 2007, Kenya.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “My goal is to eradicate all forms of discrimination against women and to ensure equal opportunities for women in education, employment and public spheres”.

She says also: “The position of women (in Ethiopia) is very difficult – economically, politically and socially … They have no voice, they have no economic power, they have no social power, and they are not organised. They cannot put pressure on the government … Uganda is a good place, Tanzania is much better than us, South Africa is much better”. (full text).

Read: BBC, Ethiopia: Revenge of the abducted bride.

Read: Should Women Forge Armed Struggle Against Abduction!? By Selamawit Seyoum.

Read: Advocacy for Legal Reform for Safe Abortion.

Read: Interview with peacewomen.

Meaza Ashenafi - Ethiopia.jpg

Meaza Ashenafi – Ethiopia

She works for the Ethiopian Women Lawyers Association EWLA,
and for the Ethiopian Constitution Commission of the Interim Government (ECCIG).

Listen to NPR-audio: ‘Fighting for Women’s Rights in Africa‘.

And she says: “There is no specific law talking about domestic violence, so we need laws there; there is no law on workplace sexual harassment. Also, we have a law on affirmative action. There is a provision under the constitution which says that women are entitled to affirmative action, but there are gaps in the law itself …

Continue Reading…

Lotti Latrous – Côte d’Ivoire

Comment first! »

See also the WSF World Social Forum 2007, Kenya.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I receive more than I give. In the hospice I feel God’s presence. I see him in Emmanuel’s smile, feel him at Aimé’s bedside, and recognize him in the gestures of blind Felix. This is my place”.

She says also: “It was in Abidjan in 2002. I was sitting in my car, when I felt irritated by a sickly smell, like that of a rotting animal. I got out of the car to find out where the irritating smell was emanating from. I found a man lying in a hole near the street, wrapped in a garbage bag. He was totally dehydrated. Although ants were crawling out of his ears and mouth, he was still breathing. When he finally looked at me I asked him how long he had been lying there, and he answered that he did not know. As I left to get help he whispered, ‘I am Monsieur René.’ The slum dwellers knew that he had been lying there for at least ten days and had occasionally brought him food and water. With their help, we took René to an outpatient clinic, where he stayed for a week. This is what inspired me to set up a hospital for dying Aids victims”.

See her Homepage Lotti Latrous.

See also the Fondation Lotti Latrous.

Lotti Latrous - Côte dIvoire redim 60p.jpg

Lotti Latrous – Côte d’Ivoire

Lotti Latrous was born in 1953. She has lived in Saudi Arabia, Nigeria and Abidjan, the economic capital of Côte d’Ivoire, where she did volunteer work at the local Mother Theresa Hospital. The contrast between the miseries she witnessed in Abidjan and her privileged life inspired her to found an outpatient clinic in Adjouffou, a slum in Abidjan.

Continue Reading…

Léonie Barakomeza – Burundi

Comment first! »

Linked with Twishakira amahoro, and with Search for common ground SFCG.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

See also the WSF World Social Forum 2007, Kenya.

She says: “I know no greater joy than meeting a friend whom I had believed was dead”.

Léonie Barakomeza - Burundi rogné redim 90p.jpg

Léonie Barakomeza – Burundi

She works for Twishakira amahoro, and for Search for Common Ground Burundi.

After civil war had broken out in Burundi, Léonie Barakomeza founded ? together with former Hutu neighbor Yvonne Ryakiye and other women ? the self-help organization Twishakira amahoro, which means ?We want peace?. The women of the peace organisation have helped in reconstructing war-damaged houses.
Over time, the river Kanyosha has dug a deep gorge through the fertile hills of Bujumbura. An equally deep rift of fear and hatred hindered the people living on its banks to use the shallow ford near Busoro.

Continue Reading…

Colette Samoya Kirura – Burundi

Comment first! »

See also the WSF World Social Forum 2007, Kenya.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “We can and must root ourselves on the long tradition of peace making that women have in Africa!”

She says also: “I cannot stand violence, so I have to do something against it. Even as a child I could not tolerate injustice”.

And she says: “It is high time we played down tribal differences, which the colonial powers stressed for their own interest. Tutsis and Hutus lived in peace before and can do it again!”

Colette Samoya Kirura - Burundi redim 50p.jpg

Colette Samoya Kirura – Burundi

She works for Bangwe and Dialogue, a peace organization.

Colette Samoya Kirura, born 1952, is a pioneer. Politically active even in her student days, she was elected to parliament between 1982 and 1987, one of only two women. From 1992 to 1994 she served as Ambassador to the UN in Geneva, where she dedicated herself to the defence of human rights. She headed the Union des Femmes Burundaises, and in 1998 she founded the peace organization Bangwe and Dialogue. It unites women of Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo, strengthening their power in the reconciliation process and providing education, especially for displaced people. Colette does not like to mention her ethnic affiliation.

Continue Reading…

Martine Bonny Dikongue – Rwanda

Comment first! »

Linked with InWEnt.

See also the WSF World Social Forum 2007, Kenya.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “My dream is to see all people smiling. Not because they have to, but because it comes from within.”

She says also: “I saw people walking through Kigali, many of them carrying weapons, and I had the impression that they were mummies. Dead. Without any expression in their eyes. They moved like machines, without perceptible feelings”.

And she says: “In Rwanda interpersonal trust was completely destroyed. People could not share their feelings with their neighbors, often not even with their brothers and sisters. So we needed a program in which individuals could open up to a confidant. These should be people with a relationship. For example, friendships exist among classmates; in a group of women who work on the same farm; or in a groups of street children”.

And she laments: “The culture of silence and mistrust is developed from an early age. Alread at two years old children were taught, that they should never say what they were thinking and never show their feelings. This takes away peoples’ ability to think freely”.

Martine Bonny Dikongue - Rwanda rogné redim 80p.jpg

Martine Bonny Dikongue – Rwanda

She works for Inser, and for Internationale Weiterbildung und Entwicklung GmbH InWEnt.

Read: Development Partnership with InWEnt.

Martine Bonny Dikongue from Cameroon was born in 1960. She is an economist and trainer for non-violent conflict resolution. She helps traumatized survivors of the Rwanda genocide to re-learn to trust people. She works with teachers and other professionals in a project financed by the German government and the Protestant Church of Rwanda.

Continue Reading…

Neema Mgana – Tanzania

Comment first! »

Linked with the International Council for Global Initiatives, and with the African Regional Youth Initiative ARYI.

See also the WSF World Social Forum 2007, Kenya.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I think that obstacles represent hidden opportunities. They make one think and act differently, often transforming our lives for the better”.

She says also: “I think I realized that we are all responsible to try to do something to alleviate such pain … “.

Neema Mgana - Tanzania redim 50p.jpg

Neema Mgana – Tanzania

Linked with Legal and Human Rights Centre-LHRC’s new book.

She works for the African Regional Youth Initiative ARYI, and for the International Council for Global Initiatives (site under construction).

Neema Mgana (29) is a young African activist who promotes social and political change. As an undergraduate student, she co-founded an Aids organization to serve children affected with HIV/Aids in Tanzania. In 2002 she founded the African Regional Youth Initiative ARYI, an organization that mobilizes youth and community-based organizations all over Africa on social and economic issues. She is also the Co-Executive Director of the International Council for Global Initiatives.

Continue Reading…

Justine Masika Bihamba – Dem. Republic of the Congo

Comment first! »

Linked with The Pole Institute, and with The Coltan Phenomenon.

See also the WSF World Social Forum 2007, Kenya.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I request people to unconditionally help victims of violence and war. Unforgettable moments occur when I successfully mediate for families and then see women return to their matrimonial homes”.

Read Report: Traumatic Gynecologic Fistula, A Consequence of Sexual Violence in Conflict Settings, May 2006.

Read: Dimitra Newsletter.

Justine Masika Bihamba (40) has worked in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) since 1990 fighting poverty, promoting peace and human rights, promoting rural women, fighting sexual violence and supporting war victims. She organizes workshops within local communities and listening centers, grants rotating credits, and provides psychosocial, medical and legal support for victims of sexual violence. Through her dedicated work people are overjoyed to have obtained justice, gained back their health and independence and experience. This is often attributed to social and structural mindsets that awfully hurt women. Since 1990, she works against poverty, and from 2000 against sexual violence, for peace making, human rights, promoting rural women, and supporting war victims.

Justine Masika Bihamba - Dem- Republic of the Congo rogné redim 75p.jpg

Justine Masika Bihamba – Dem. Republic of the Congo

She works for the Pole Institute, and for ‘Synergy des Femmes pour les Victimes des violences Sexuelles SFVS’.

Read: An open Wound, The Issue of gender-based violence in North Kivu.
Same Text on Pole-Institute.org.

Justine Masika obtained a national diploma in 1985. She is preparing for a graduate degree in community development from the Interdisciplinary Center of Permanent Education and Development. She trained in 2000 on activity planning in Goma, DRC, then on reinforcing capacity on mediation and conflict management in Cameroon and Benin, followed by programming tools in DRC in 2002.

Continue Reading…

Hrant Dink – Turkey (Sept. 15, 1954 – Jan. 19, 2007)

Comment first! »

Linked with ‘The Pigeon-like Unease of My Inner Spirit‘.

It is ironic that Dink got into trouble for suggesting to diaspora Armenians that it was time to rid themselves of their rage against the Turks.
He said: “Armenians, especially of the diaspora, tend to have a problem associated with the role of other that the Turk has played in forming the Armenian identity. There is a certain history. A trauma. The Turk has become such a source of pain that it ‘poisons the Armenian blood’, as the Anatolian saying goes. In my article, I was addressing the Armenian world and saying: ‘There are two ways of getting rid of this poison. One way is for the Turks to empathise with you, and take action to reduce your trauma. At the moment this seems unlikely. The second way is for you to rid yourself of it yourself. Turn your attention towards the state of Armenia and replace the poisoned blood associated with the Turk, with fresh blood associated with Armenia”.
It was the reference to ‘poisoned blood’ associated with the Turk that got Dink in court. (All citations of Open Democracy).

And he said: “I’m living together with Turks in this country … And I’m in complete solidarity with them. I don’t think I could live with an identity of having insulted them in this country”.

He said also: “I was found guilty of racism! How can this be? All my life I have struggled against ethnic discrimination and racism. I would never belittle Turkishness or Armenianness. I wouldn’t allow anyone else to do it, either”.

Bio: Hrant Dink was born in Malatya on September 15th, 1954. At the age of seven, he migrated to Istanbul together with his family. He got his primary and secondary education in Armenian schools. Immediately after lyceum, he got married. He graduated from Zoology Department of Ýstanbul University’s Science Faculty. Then he continued his education at Philosophy Department of the same universities Literature Faculty for a while. Since 1996 he works as the columnist and editor-in chief of AGOS weekly newspaper which can be regarded as the voice of Armenian community. He tries to make this newspaper a democrat and oppositional voice of Turkey and also to share the injustices done to Armenian community with public opinion. One of the major aims of the newspaper is to contribute to dialogue between Turkish and Armenian nations and also between Turkey and Armenia. He takes part in various democratic platforms and civil society organizations. (The Anatolian Times).

Hrant Dink - Turkey one.jpg

Hrant Dink – Turkey (September 15, 1954 – January 19, 2007)

Hrant Dink (September 15, 1954 – January 19, 2007) was born in Malatya. He was best known for his role as editor of ‘Agos’ Armenian Language weekly in Istanbul. He worked as the columnist and editor-in chief of AGOS weekly newspaper, which can be regarded as the voice of Armenian community, from 1996 until January 19, 2007 when he was shot dead outside of his office.

Continue Reading…

Ching Chee Lee – Hong Kong SAR

Comment first! »

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I live by four main principles: give up not, refuse not, fear not and have hope ? I may be disappointed, but I never give up hope.”

Born in Hong Kong in 1932, Pastor Lee Ching Chee has devoted herself to the duties of the Church and education. She has rewritten the history of the ministry, which was once monopolized by male pastors. A female leader in the Church, Pastor Lee was officially ordained pastor in the 1960s when the Church was very conservative. Pastor Lee has paved the way for female ministry, and has proved that both sexes should enjoy an equal opportunity to serve in the ministry. She has been noted for her peaceful and cooperative approach. Pastor Lee Ching Chee is a female leader in the Church of Hong Kong and is the first officially ordained female pastor in the territory. She is devoted to her ministry and to education, adopting peaceful and cooperative approaches.

Ching Chee Lee - Hong Kong SAR rogné.jpg

Ching Chee Lee – Hong Kong SAR

She is a retired pastor.

Lee Ching Chee was ordained pastor in 1966. It is a lifelong commitment. Even though she is now retired, Pastor Lee still carries out her duties as a pastor. She is one of the few leaders in the Church who advocate ecumenism. She was responsible for introducing the mission of the Ecumenical Community to Hong Kong, for instance by participating in the Hong Kong Christian Council, and other denominations. Pastor Lee has a world vision and at the same time has focused on building a solid foundation in Hong Kong by linking ecumenism with local beliefs.

Continue Reading…

Johan Galtung – Norway

Comment first! »

Linked with Transcent, with Kai Frithof Brand-Jacobsen – Romania & Canada & Norway, with The power of non-violence, with Violence, War, and Their Impact, with The Transnational Foundation, and with TRANSCEND’s Advanced International Training Programme.

Johan Galtung (born October 24, 1930, in Oslo, Norway) is a Norwegian professor, founder and Director of TRANSCEND, a Peace and Development Network for Conflict Transformation by Peaceful Means, with more than 300 members from over 80 countries around the world. He is also Rector of TRANSCEND Peace University (TPU). He is seen as the pioneer of peace and conflict research and founded the International Peace Research Institute in Oslo. He is also one of the authors of an influential account of news values, the factors which determine coverage given to a given topic in the news media. Galtung also originated the concept of Peace Journalism, increasingly influential in communications and media studies. (Read more on wikipedia).

He says, about non-violent struggle: ” … You should rather start with a Buddhist-Hindu conceptualization of karma, and stress the Co-dependent Origination Principle in Buddhism which, in Japanese, is referred to as ‘engi.’ This idea is that you and I may think we are separated today by gigantic differences, but if we look a little bit deeper, back in time, we are actually united. We have to get back to this bedrock of universality whenever there’s something separating us. If there’s conflict we must step back and say, “Why don’t we sit down and talk about this?” The image I use is of karma as a boat. The problems of life require us to travel in that boat together when the water is seeping in and the boat is slowly sinking. Now the good Western approach is to blame somebody for the predicament. We want to assemble a courtroom at the tail end of the boat while it is sinking nicely. A good Buddhist approach is to say, well, let us meditate first. Go inside ourselves. Then we can have a dialogue, and out of the dialogue we can decide what to do about the leaks. And while doing that, we may consider constructing a new boat. The question ‘Who did what?’ becomes immaterial. I completely embrace this method, and so did Gandhi. At one point he even said that perhaps he was actually a Buddhist”. (Read more on portland independent media center).

Johan Galtung - Norway two.jpg

Johan Galtung – Norway

Listen to four video-clips on Big-Picture.

Read all articles of Johan Galtung on Transcent.

He is an experienced peace worker and Professor of Peace Studies, he is widely regarded as the founder of the academic discipline of peace research and one of the leading pioneers of peace and conflict transformation in theory and practice.

Continue Reading…

Kai Frithjof Brand-Jacobsen – Romania & Canada & Norway

Comment first! »

Linked with Transcent, with The Power of Non-Violence, with Johan Galtung – Norway, with Violence, War, and Their Impact, with The Transnational Foundation, and with TRANSCEND’s Advanced International Training Program.

Kai Brand-Jacobsen is Director of the Peace Action, Training and Research Institute of Romania (PATRIR) and is Co-Director of Transcend, a development organization dedicated to resolving conflict by peaceful means. He is also a global consultant and expert advisor and practitioner on peacebuilding, conflict transformation, war-to-peace transitions, and post-war reconciliation and healing. He is promoting local development, community empowerment, and peacebuilding. He talks about how violence is built in to the fabric of our present social, economic and political systems. He talks about three levels of violence that pervade society – direct violence, structural violence and cultural violence. He explains how structural and cultural violence manifest themselves in numerous subtle ways and gives examples of both cases. He goes on to suggest how together they often lead to acts of direct violence such as war and terrorism. (Listen to the five videos of around 5 minutes, recorded all in November 2004 with Big-Picture).

He says: “Cultural Violence are the ideas, values and belief systems, world-views and cosmologies which make violence seem normal, acceptable, correct, or the best/only option, the good, the ‘chosen’/‘sacred’ path. Examples of cultural violence include those elements of cultures and values which legitimize ‘untouchability’, patriarchy, the exploitation of women, workers and the young, unequal development, concentration of power and wealth in the hands of certain castes/classes/families/nations, etc., beliefs in the superiority of one group, gender, caste, nationality, over another. Belief systems and values which make the structures of violence seem legitimate or seek to enforce them as ‘good’ or the only option/the way things are, the need to ‘crush’ the other side, to ‘eliminate’ them; discrimination against people because of their language, religion, gender, culture, nationality or group. Also: values which legitimize violence as good when used in a ‘noble/just’ cause, or when used against the evil ‘other’, ie. violence is acceptable/legitimate because we are fighting against an unacceptable system/structure or against bad/evil actors. Cultural violence is also the belief that ‘I/we can’t do anything’, that violence is normal, that only those ‘with power’ (politicians, combatants, soldiers, generals/presidents/kings/god/, foreign organisations) can do anything to overcome/solve it or change things, ie. that ‘we’, as people, are powerless. Or that ‘power comes from the barrel of a gun’: therefore, for us to have power, we must pick up the gun. Forms of cultural violence are impressed and internalized in all of us, through our upbringing, exposure to culture and the media, myths, national anthems, monuments, folk tales, songs, jokes, education, street signs. Often, even movements working to overcome violence and exploitation, including nonviolent movements and struggles, can be affected by a war culture approach to conflicts and social change”. (On Transcent.org).

Find the links to his articles on this page of Transcent.

Kai Brand-Jacobsen - Romania one.jpg

Kai Frithof Brand-Jacobsen – Romania & Canada & Norway

Read: BEYOND SECURITY; NEW APPROACHES, NEW PERSPECTIVES, NEW ACTORS.

Kai has worked in Afghanistan, India, Pakistan, Nepal, Russia, Moldova, South Eastern Europe, Colombia, Cambodia, southern Thailand, Burma, Somalia, Aceh, North America, and the Middle East at the invitation of governments, inter-governmental organisations, UN agencies, local organizations and communities promoting local development, community empowerment, and peacebuilding.

Continue Reading…

José Ramos Horta – East Timor

Comment first! »

On July 10 2006, he was officially sworn in as the second Prime Minister of East Timor. He is also the 1996 Nobel Peace Prize recipient.

Normally I do not put persons on this website being part of the so called High Elite: Governments, persons in high ranking jobs in the Economy and Society. José Ramos Horta is there an exception. So, José Ramos Horta, Prime Ministre of East Timor, shall be presented on this sites, because of his Christmas message to Osama Bin Laden:

He said: “On this occasion, when we are celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ, my words, words of peace, are sent to my brother somewhere in the mountains, in the caves of Afghanistan and Pakistan, Osama bin Laden. Yes, there are some differences between yourself, my brother Osama bin Laden, and myself. The differences are that while you seem to have a profound resentment towards those who had done centuries of harm to Muslims, and today to Palestinians — I do understand these grievances — and yet I fail to understand why you carry this resentment, this anger onto attacking innocent civilians — and that includes also Arabs and Muslims who do not share your vision of Islam. I come from a small country, East Timor, that was invaded by the largest Muslim country in the world (Indonesia). I lost brothers and sisters, yet I do not hate one single Muslim, I do not hate one single Indonesian. I beg you to re-think and extend your love, your solidarity, your friendship, the same ones you feel about Palestinians, extend to the rest of the world, extend to Europeans, to Christians. You will then win them over that way, more than through hatred and violence”.

José Ramos Horta - East Timor two.jpg

José Ramos Horta – East Timor

He says also: “One thing I am proud of is that in 24 years of our struggle not one single Indonesian civilian was targeted by the resistance,” he has said. “No Indonesian civilians, no Indonesian settlers were killed in this country in 24 years. No terrorist tactics were ever used against Indonesians in this country, and there was no hatred towards Indonesians.” (Read more on more or less).

Read about ASEAN, Cebu, Philippines:
Highly successful Cebu summits end as PGMA thanks Asia Pacific leaders for attendance, today Jan. 15, 2007.
Timor Leste Thanks ASEAN, Jan 13, 2007.

Continue Reading…

Sonia Pierre – Dominican Republic

Comment first! »

Linked with International Women’s Rights Action Watch irwaw, with The Dominican Republic Country Report, and with the Movement for Dominican Women of Haitian Decent MUDHA.

She says: “This award strengthens our work at MUDHA, our institution, and our communities,? said Sonia upon receiving the award. ?As a human rights activist, who has been fighting for the recognition of the human rights of Haitian immigrants and their descendents, since an early age, I owe this award to the communities MUDHA supports, to my colleagues and to all who believed in our work”.

Under Sonia’s leadership, MUDHA has risen to protect the rights of the Dominican Republic?s Haitian immigrants and their descendants and to empower women and children in the face of deep rooted discrimination and intolerance. Despite threats against her life, Sonia has been a driving force for change and a leader in the movement to end human rights violations against Haitians in the Dominican Republic. (Read all on caribeannetnews.com).

Sonia Pierre - Dominican Republic seule.jpg

Sonia Pierre – Dominican Republic

She works for the Movement for Dominican Women of Haitian Decent MUDHA.

Like thousands of ethnic Haitians born in the Dominican Republic, Sonia Pierre’s family had previously crossed the border in search of greater work opportunities than were available to them in Haiti. While the sugar-cane fields of the Dominican Republic provided jobs to migrant workers who sought to eke out a subsistence living, such workers were viewed as both a valuable source of cheap labor to the Dominican economy and as dark-skinned undesirables who belonged to the margins of Dominican society.
A Question of Identity: The anti-Haitian sentiment which, in the eyes of the young Sonia, characterized the treatment of ethnic Haitians throughout mainstream Dominican society has continued to this day unabated, according to Ms. Pierre, notwithstanding mounting pressure from international organizations and human rights groups. “In my country, Dominican children of Haitian descent suffer discrimination from the moment they are born,” Ms. Pierre said in Spanish, her voice choked with emotion upon accepting the award. “The Dominican Constitution established that all who are born in the Dominican Republic are Dominicans. However, the authorities refuse to issue birth certificates to the children of Haitian immigrants born in the country.”

Continue Reading…

Elzita Santa Cruz Oliveira – Brazil

Comment first! »

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “?I raised my children to be decent and brave persons, to defend whatever they think is right?”

Elzita Santa Cruz Oliveira - Brazil rogné redim 60p.jpg

Elzita Santa Cruz Oliveira – Brazil

?Where is my son?? The question that Elzita Santa Cruz Oliveira (born 1913) asked was never answered. During the 1970s, when Brazil was frightened and terrified, Elzita, a housewife, faced the military forces in the search for the fifth of her ten children. She has written hundreds of letters to politicians, to national and international organizations for human rights. Elzita has gathered mothers who shared her pain. She symbolizes all Brazilian mothers whose children were victims of the military regime’s oppression.?

?Old Zita! Old Zita!? When Elzita Santa Cruz Oliveira gathers her family, she still feels like she can hear her son Fernando, who disappeared in 1974. ?He used to call me ?Old Zita?. Fernando Augusto de Santa Cruz Oliveira, a student and militant of the Popular Action ? a revolutionary organization of the left-wing catholic movement-, left home in an afternoon during the celebration of carnival in Rio, to meet a friend. He never came back. It makes Elzita, 92 years old, sad to remember the past. She goes back to the beginning of the 70?s. That is when the daughter of a sugar plantation owner, a rich girl raised to marry, had her peaceful life as a housewife in Olinda, Pernambuco, shook up by the dictatorship?s cruelty.

Continue Reading…

Wai King Wong – Hong Kong SAR

Comment first! »

Linked with .

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “To preserve culture, the human being is the prime factor. If people in a community do not see the importance of safeguarding it, development is an empty word”.

Wai King Wong - Hong Kong SAR rogné.jpg
Wai King Wong – Hong Kong SAR

She works as founding member for the Tai O Cultural Workshop.

A Hong Kong native, Wong Wai King is a housewife living in Tai O, a small fishing village on western Lantau Island, the largest outlying island of Hong Kong. She began her community services for the elderly and people with different abilities in her home village in the early 1980s. From 1990 onward, she has actively engaged in safeguarding the ecological environment of Tai O, challenging government- corporation collusion and patriarchal ideologies.

Continue Reading…

Jason Rezaian – Iran & USA

Comment first! »

Linked with A World Between, and with The Iran Media Service.

He makes frequent trips to Iran, and has made a variety of reports for the San Francisco Chronicle across different media, blending articles, blogs, video reports and podcasts to offer a rounder picture of news from Iran. He also serves as a guide to other Western journalists, most recently for Christopher Hitchens of Vanity Fair. His blog “Inside Iran” is currently featured on the San Francisco Chronicle’s website.

He says: ”I’ve also written many articles on Iran and produced and appear in a feature length documentary about Iran, and I am available to publications and television networks unable to send journalists to Iran … I am one of a very few United States citizens who is able to freely travel to and from Iran, and work there as well”.

Read: Holocaust Conference, Iran’s Holocaust cartoon exhibition, by:Jason Rezaian, December 13 2006.

Jason Rezaian - Iran & USA.jpg

Jason Rezaian – Iran & USA

He is the Founder and Director of The Iran Media Service, founded in 2000.

Read: Tourists in a divided kingdom, Mosques, Starbucks found in Saudi Arabia, by Jason Rezaian, December 10, 2006.

He is a documentary filmmaker based in Marin, CA who runs a blog on sfgate.com called Inside Iran. (See SFgate).

He is also an Iranian-American freelance journalist whose work on Iran has been featured in Vanity Fair and the San Francisco Chronicle.

Continue Reading…

María del Carmen Sarthes – Argentina

Comment first! »

Linked with Catholics for the Right to Decide.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “In order to be able to help raped and maltreated women, they first have to recognize themselves as victims of violence”.

She tells: “The priest said: be patient, your husband may have had a bad day. Wait on him with joy and make him some good food. That was in opposition to what the Gospel states which is that violence is violence and that it cannot be justified”.

She maintains: “It was verified the fact that women have to bear the responsibility over sexuality”.

María del Carmen Sarthes - Argentina rogné redim 90p.jpg

María del Carmen Sarthes – Argentina

She works for the Católicas pelo Direito de Decidir / Catholics for the Right to Decide.

She has been weaving for 23 years. Her name is María del Carmen Sarthes. She comes from Argentina. With this traditionally female activity, she weaves hope, fighting for the rights of women, children and adolescents. She supports raped and maltreated women, gives workshops and seminars about sexual and reproductive health and against violence. She marches, teaches, accompanies and continues weaving. She has a husband, four sons and female companions.

Continue Reading…

Rahela Khatun – Bangladesh

Comment first! »

Linked with The Bangladesh Environmental Lawyers Association BELA.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Earlier all I did was sit at home, cook and obey my husband’s orders. I never felt that I was of any worth! After joining this landless people’s group, I came out of the house, got to know other people and learnt the language of public speaking. Now, I do not think only about my own family, but also about the development of my country. Now, I am a person who can speak against injustice, mobilize people to join our struggle against corrupt machineries, and fight for poor peoples’ rights to life and livelihood”.

She also publicly raise questions: “Why should we not come out? We are not doing anything against the religion?” (The moulavi, head priest of the local mosque, warned Rahela’s husband, telling him that she was doing un-Islamic things, such as attending meetings with unknown men and going out on her own – bepurdah (without a veil). None of this served to stop Rahela.

Rahela Khatun - Bangladesh redim 50p.jpg

Rahela Khatun – Bangladesh (even in the original size of this photo you could not see her face – too dark / hidden).

She works for the Noai Landless Women Organization, and for the Deluti Landless Union Committee.

Continue Reading…

Drucilla K. Barker – USA

Comment first! »

Linked with Microcredit and Women’s Poverty, and with Good Governance and Participatory Development.

She is Professor of Economics and Director of Women’s Studies, Hollins University, Roanoke, VA 245020.

She says: ” … I don’t like to say what feminist economics is in that sense. I much prefer to think about what are some approaches that characterize feminist economics and define it by those approaches. Gender analysis is central to all these approaches. In other words, a recognition of the social construction of gender, and its intersections with ethnicity, class, nationality, sexual identity and so forth. So feminist approaches examine the ways in which the organization of the economy, especially the gender division of labor, reflects, reproduces and transforms these social hierarchies. Feminist approaches do not privilege the market, but rather examine other ways that societies provide for their material well-being. Thus they recognize that economies are not populated by disembodied actors, but rather by historically situated subjects”. (Interview on Wellesley College).

Drucilla K- Barker - USA one.jpg

Drucilla K. Barker – USA

The value of the 1997 increase in the federal minimum wage has been fully eroded. The real value of today’s federal minimum wage is less than it has been since 1951. Moreover, the ratio of the minimum wage to the average hourly wage of non-supervisory workers is 31%, its lowest level since World War II. This decline is causing hardship for low-wage workers and their families. We believe that a modest increase in the minimum wage would improve the well-being of low-wage workers and would not have the adverse effects that critics have claimed.

Continue Reading…

Rina Amiri – Afghanistan & USA

Comment first! »

Linked with Women Likely to Suffer Most in Central Asia’s Turmoil, with Muslim Women As Symbols and Pawns, with the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan RAWA, and with The Women Waging Peace Network.

She says: “I felt destroyed within seeing that, my adopted country (USA) and my homeland (Afghanistan) were at war.”

Read: The Fear Beneath the Burka, by Rina Amiri, The New York Times – March 20, 2002.

She says also: “As a child in this climate of fear, I was confused and felt anger. From a secure, warm and loving family life, I suddenly learned that the world could lack any element of control”.

Rina Amiri - Afghanistan one.jpg

Rina Amiri – Afghanistan & USA

She works for The Women Waging Peace Network.

Listen to her audio/ watch her video on OnlineNewsHour.

Read: Afghanis in the Driver’s Seat, Rina Amiri addresses Afghanistan’s current status.

Rina Amiri has been preparing since she was a child for her present dynamic role as a peace builder and reconstruction strategist in her devastated homeland, Afghanistan. It is a role she has longed for, and to which she has been passionately committed for as long as she can remember. Yet before the events of September 2001, it seemed inconceivable that she could return to her country, devastated by decades of invasion, clan warfare, drought, and famine.

Continue Reading…

Virginia/Ginny Shrivastava – India

Comment first! »

Linked with ASHTA SANSTHAN.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: ”It is a long way from Canada to working at the Indian grassroots with tendu patta (tobacco leaf) collectors and widows, and clashing with the authorities – but Ginny is finally home”.

Nobel Peace Prize nominee in Kingston to receive 2005 Queen’s Alumni Achievement Award, November 01, 2005, Kingston, ON – The Queen’s University Alumni Association recognized the outstanding accomplishments of Dr. Virginia (Ginny) Shrivastava Arts’63 by presenting her with the 2005 Alumni Achievement Award at a special ceremony in Kingston held at the University Club at Queen’s. Friends, family, and faculty and classmates from her Queen’s days were also on hand to celebrate this moment. (Read all on Queen’s University).

Read: Widow’s Stories, Kamal Patik age 40, A Leader in the Association of Strong Women Alone, Rajasthan, is the widow of the late Kailash Patik. (Read her story on widows rights).

Virginia Ginny Shrivastava - India two.jpg

Virginia/Ginny Shrivastava – India

She works for ASHTA SANSTHAN, for the Association of Strong Women Alone ASWA (named on GlobalHRs.org), and for the Budget Analysis Rajasthan Center BARC.

Virginia/Ginny Shrivastava, born Dobson, was born in Canada on 9 August 1942, the day Gandhi started the “Quit India Movement” to throw all foreigners out of India. She has been working with women in Rajasthan since 1970. The main driving force behind the Association of Strong Women Alone, a registered society of low-income single women, Ginny has focused on building the leadership capabilities of grassroots women. Also actively involved with tribal groups, Ginny mobilized them to pressure the government to give them minimum wages for collecting tendu patta (tobacco leaves), and helped them form a Tendu Patta Cooperative.

Continue Reading…

Hazel Henderson – England & USA

Comment first! »

Linked with The Politics of Money, and with Good Governance and Participatory Development.

She is Author, Independent Futurist, Worldwide syndicated columnist, she advocates for and consults on equitable ecologically sustainable human development and socially responsible business and investment. She act in over thirty countries. In 1996 she co-created the Country Futures Indicators as an alternative to Gross Domestic Product. She is born 1933 in Bristol, England.

Read: The Nobel Prize that isn’t.

She says: ”Women know how much time, love and effort goes into raising a child. When war arises, all that is reduced to nothing … this is why women’s active participation in conflict resolution is of great importance … We have the power to alter our destiny … If we can recognize that change and uncertainty are basic principles, we can greet the future and the transformation we are undergoing with the understanding that we do not know enough to be pessimistic”.

Read: Iraq, the Dollar and the Euro.

Hazel Henderson - USA one.JPG

Hazel Henderson – England & USA

She says also: “It doesn’t take a genius to pump up the GNP [of a developing country] by burning down rainforests, using slave labor and social repression to keep things in place. GNP values, for example bombs and bullets, since they are things that are produced for money (It) does not value the environment. It values salaries paid to teachers, but it does not value what people know – how educated they are. It places no value on `human capital,’ meaning people. It does not even place a value on the public infrastructure”.

Continue Reading…

George Monbiot – England

Comment first! »

Linked with World Changing.com, and with Other Economies are Possible!

Read: Get ready for more future shock.

George Monbiot is the author of the best selling books The Age of Consent: a manifesto for a new world order and Captive State: the corporate takeover of Britain; as well as the investigative travel books Poisoned Arrows, Amazon Watershed and No Man’s Land. He writes a weekly column for the Guardian newspaper…
… He is currently visiting professor of planning at Oxford Brookes University. In 1995 Nelson Mandela presented him with a United Nations Global 500 Award for outstanding environmental achievement. He has also won the Lloyds National Screenwriting Prize for his screenplay The Norwegian, a Sony Award for radio production, the Sir Peter Kent Award and the OneWorld National Press Award. (See his blog Monbiot.com).

Read this commentary (pull down the page to find it): In War On Terror, America Embraces The Very Evils It Claims To Confront.

George Monbiot (born January 27, 1963) is a leftwing journalist, author, academic and environmental and political activist in the United Kingdom who writes a weekly column for The Guardian newspaper. (wikipedia).

George Monbiot - England one.jpg

George Monbiot – England

He says: “For me, perhaps the best way, potentially, is to develop the perspective put forward by Paulo Friere in The Pedagogy of the Oppressed (http://www.marxists.org/subject/education/freire/pedagogy/index.htm), where the popular educators are themselves educated by the population. On the one hand, you help them to develop a perspective, an understanding of their own oppression, where power lies and what the problems are, and then as they advance that understanding they transmit their perspectives upwards, through the social levels, to the intellectuals”. (Weekly-Al-Ahram)

Read: January 4, 2007, Breaking News About Exxon Funding Lies.

Read: Their beliefs are bonkers, but they are at the heart of power.

Continue Reading…

Victoria Curzon-Price – Switzerland

Comment first! »

Linked with Complaint on Swiss Taxes, and with Economic Growth and Unequal Wealth Distribution.

She defends a neo-liberal economy, with a state giving all freedom to markets, with low taxes and with the protection of privat possession for economic owners.

Current functions: she is
President of the Mont Pelerin Society (since 2004);
Professor of economics at the University of Geneva, Switzerland (since 1992), (and on wikipedia;
Professor at the Graduate Institute of European Studies, Economics Section (since 1984);
Academic director and president of the board of directors of the
Institut Constant de Rebecque (since 2005), (and on wikipedia.
She is also in the Advisory Board of the Free Society Institute, as in the Advisory Board of the Institute of Economic Affairs iea.

Victoria Curzon-Price - Switzerland one.jpg

Victoria Curzon-Price – Switzerland

Listen to her audio at the Prague Conference on Political Economy, April 2006.
Pull down to ‘Economics of Development’ and click on the audio item.

She writes: ”A defence of inequalities based on property rights takes the debate onto an entirely different level. Thus for Locke the right to material property is only one aspect (but an inherent and inseparable aspect) of individual property rights which encompass the right of possession over one’s own body, one’s right to freedom of thought and conscience, and the right to the fruits of one’s own efforts. Interference by others with any one of these freedoms is a violation of property rights in the broadest sense and is felt to be deeply unjust. Conversely, I have no right to interfere in other people’s property rights. According to Locke, this rule makes for social harmony.

Continue Reading…

Azra Hasanbegovic – Bosnia and Herzegovina

Comment first! »

Linked with the Association “ŽENA BIH”, Mostar, with Bosnia and Herzegovina, Hopes Betrayed, and with Trafficking Women and Children.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Everyone has duties to the community in which a free and integral development of one’s personality is possible”.

Azra Hasanbegovic - Bosnia and Herzegovina rogné.jpg

Azra Hasanbegovic – Bosnia and Herzegovina

She works for Žena Bosnia and Herzegovina/Žena BiH.

Since the beginning of the armed conflict in Mostar in April 1992, Azra Hasanbegovic helped organize small groups that assisted people most badly struck by the war. She initiated the women’s association Žena BiH, whose main mission is to struggle for women’s right to work. She also established the Agency for Free Legal Aid and Services and an SOS hotline. At the same time, she worked on documentation of the suffering of Mostar and Prozor women and submitted a detailed report to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights.Since the beginning of the armed conflict in Mostar in April 1992, Azra Hasanbegovic endeavored to establish a life, “a bit close to normal,” in a city suffering from chaos.

Continue Reading…

Erika Lesser – USA

Comment first! »

Linked with Slow Food USA.

Erika Lesser is the Executive Director of Slow Food USA, based in New York City. Slow Food is a global movement dedicated to the preservation of traditional food culture. In this two-part series Erika Lesser, Director of Slow Food USA, compares slow food with fast food culture. Whereas the latter tastes the same anywhere in the world, slow food celebrates diverse local food flavours and taste. Slow Food means knowing where food comes from and what the true costs of production are. It is also about food security – understanding that a varied food supply is a safe one.(Listen to her three speaches of 4.42, 4.49 and 4.09 minutes, recorded on Big-Picture on April 2005).

She says: “The point is to provide consumers with viable local alternatives and a pleasant environment to learn about them. You know, Isn’t this delicious, don’t you want to know more? On a gastronomic level but also on a social and economic level, it gives you the opportunity to support a local business”.

She says also: “Our mission has evolved over the years, beginning with the ideals of old-school gastronomy (long lunches, good wine) in the late 1980’s, to a new concept of “eco-gastronomy” (biodiversity and pleasure on the plate) in the 1990’s and “good, clean and fair food” (a system-wide approach, incorporating politics, social justice, environmentalism and a new definition of quality) in the new millennium. Our members run the gamut, from home cooks, gardeners, winemakers, journalists, farmers, and chefs to environmentalists, back-to-the-landers, educators, artists, politicians, liberals and conservatives alike”.

erika_lesser USA.jpg

Erika Lesser – USA

She works for Slow Food USA, based in New York City.

New York, NY – Slow Food USA is pleased to name Erika Lesser as its new Executive Director, effective June 1st. Erika returns to the National Office in New York City with over four years of experience with Slow Food, including three years working for Slow Food USA’s National Office beginning at its founding in March 2000, and the past year working to open the new University of Gastronomic Sciences in Pollenzo, Italy.

Continue Reading…

Maninha Xukuru-Kariri – Brazil (1966 – 2006)

Comment first! »

Linked with Indigenous representatives campaign in Europe, with The Forum for the Defense of Indigenous Rights APOINME, with The World Rainforest Movement WRM, and with Aracruz Celulose and the World Cup: propaganda and deforestation.

See also: Alert against the Green Desert Movement, and Table of indigenous organisations of Brazil.

Maninha Xukuru-Kariri died on 11th octobre 2006 in the state OF Alagoas. She was experiencing respiratory problems, had a heart failure and was not treated quickly enough in the hospital of that city.

She was one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She said: “Society tries to deny indigenous origin. They took our land, our language and our beliefs. Today, we know who we are, what are our rights and the status we wish to occupy in the history”.

“Nós vivemos no estado do Alagoas, temos várias comunidades e vivemos da agricultura, … etc etc. Nossa área é de 10.000 metros e temos 1000 habitantes. Aqui você vai encontrar muitas histórias sobre nossas aldeias, participe, envie seus comentários”.

Maninha Xukuru-Kariri - Brazil (1966 - 2006) redim 60p.jpg

Maninha Xukuru-Kariri – Brazil (1966 – 2006)

She works for the Articulação dos Povos e Organizações Indígenas do Nordeste, Minas Gerais e Espírito Santo APOINME.

During the first days of 2005, an indigenous baby died of malnutrition. Less than a month later, in another indigenous settlement, a little girl was unable to reach age four. She also had nothing to eat. In two decades, Maninha Xukuru (born 1966) has challenged latifundiary land owners, politicians, unlawful land possessors and citizens in general. Her battle: to win back the land of her people, the Xukuru-Kariri. Her goal: to ensure the effectiveness of indigenous rights.

Continue Reading…