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Index February 2007

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Cynthia McKinney – USA

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Linked with The World Can’t Wait, Won’t Wait, Isn’t Waiting.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “We are way more powerful when we turn to each other and not on each other, when we celebrate our diversity, focus on our commonality, and together tear down the mighty walls of injustice”.

Cynthia McKinney is an outspoken leader for peace, human rights, and justice. As a result of questioning her congressional colleagues about the lack of full investigation after September 11 attacks, a retaliatory campaign successfully unseated her for one term, but in 2004 she was easily reelected. In her first term, she got legislation passed to extend health benefits for Vietnam War veteran victims of Agent Orange and sponsored legislation to end the use of depleted-uranium weapons. As a ranking member of the Human Rights Subcommittee, she prompted the UN to investigate the Rwanda genocide. (Read all on 1000peacewomen 2005).

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Cynthia McKinney – USA

She worked for the US Congress, the US House of Repr., House Armed Services Committee.

Honors and recognition: McKinney has been featured in a full-length motion picture titled American Blackout. On April 14, 2006, she received the key to the city of Sarasota, Florida and was doubly honored when the city named April 8 as “Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney Day” in Sarasota. On June 14, 2000, Rep. McKinney was honored when part of Memorial Drive, a major thoroughfare running through her district, was renamed “Cynthia McKinney Parkway.” Memorial Drive leads from south Atlanta to Stone Mountain. Her father had previously been honored when a portion of Interstate 285 in Atlanta was dedicated as “Billy McKinney Parkway.”

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Chhing Lamu Sherpa – Nepal

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Linked with Mountain Spirit MS.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I believe that it is important to contribute to the root of a tree for good fruits”.

She says also: “Appreciative Inquiry changed me. It has become a part of my life, my family, and everything I do. Once I started to say things positively, life has become comfortable and easy” … and: , “You must not only teach how to catch fish, but you must do things. You must act!”

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Chhing Lamu Sherpa – Nepal

She works for Plan Nepal, and for Mountain Spirit.
She is member of ‘Imagine Nepal.org‘.

Read: ‘ … on PRA and Participation in Nepal‘, 52 p., March 24, 2000.

For the past two decades, Chhing Lamu Sherpa (born 1960) has played a pivotal role in empowering women and extremely marginalized groups in eastern Nepal. As an educated professional woman working to improve the lives of poor and deprived mountain communities, she is a role model for other members of Nepal’s Sherpa community, an ethnic minority living off the rural mountainous areas, often as expedition guides. She had to face ridicule when she started to go to school – Sherpa was an “old” 17 years of age.

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John Pilger – Australia & England

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Linked with CBNRM.Net.

First read: Iran, A War Is Coming, by John Pilger, February 3, 2007 – The United States is planning what will be a catastrophic attack on Iran … (full text).

John Pilger (born October 9, 1939) is an Australian journalist and documentary filmmaker from Sydney, primarily based in London, England. He told, in an address at Columbia University, on 14 April 2006: ”During the Cold War, a group of Russian journalists toured the United States. On the final day of their visit, they were asked by their hosts for their impressions. ‘I have to tell you,’ said their spokesman, ‘that we were astonished to find after reading all the newspapers and watching TV, that all the opinions on all the vital issues were by and large, the same. To get that result in our country, we imprison people, we tear out their fingernails. Here, you don’t have that. What’s the secret? How do you do it?’ “. (wikipedia).

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John Pilger – Australia & England

Read: War with Iran is coming.

He says also: “what I wanted to do – and I’ve tried to do this in most of my films – is not just simply assault people’s emotions… you saw that… it’s not difficult to do, but when you start to make sense of something then you stray into what’s called the political area”. (full text).

Journalist John Pilger told the crowd of the majority of the white population of Australia would not be able to retain their nationhood until they recognised the Aboriginal nation as first in the country. He linked the Hickey case to the prosecution of a Queensland policeman charged over an Aboriginal death in custody on Palm island. Police made no arrests. (full text).

He has also written for various French, Italian, Scandinavian, Canadian and Japanese newspapers and periodicals, among others, and has contributed to the BBC’s news service. He is on the advisory board of UKWatch.

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Boualaphet Chounthavong – Laos

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Linked with Village Focus International VFI. – She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “I enjoy my work and am happy when people feel proud of our work”. And: “The climate becomes drier, unlike the past when rainfall was consistent, now we are suffering from drought, and lack of water. Many wild animals that cannot find food start to roam around and eat the villager’s produce. If we do not take care of our own food, well, all the animals, wild boar, barking deer and other deer will eat it all”.

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Boualaphet Chounthavong – Laos

She works for Village Focus International VFI. And with The Community-Based Natural Resource Management Network CBNRM.Net.

Her bio.

Boualaphet Chounthavong was born in 1967 in Salawan province, southern Laos, at the height of the Vietnam War. Her father was a teacher who was promoted after the war to a high-ranking post in the Ministry of Education. Her mother was a member of the Laos Women Union. Studying on a government scholarship, Boualaphet obtained her degree in medicine from the National University of Medicine in Laos in 1993.

But instead of opening a high profile medical practice in the capital, which should have earned her a convenient life as a physician, she decided to return to her rural village in Salawan province. She chose to work in a very remote and backward neighborhood in the rural areas.

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Elizabeth Neuenschwander – Switzerland

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “We should remember that we will not live forever, that at one point we will pass away. And therefore, it is useless to accumulate too much for ourselves. It is better to create something valuable”.

She says also: “At home, we were never rich. And still, I realized very early on that we are all quite wealthy in Switzerland. I am convinced that we do not need everything for ourselves. So let us share with other people, living in other places that are less privileged. We should not leave people there in poverty and misery. With our wealth and know-how, we can help them to help themselves.” Under this motto, Elizabeth Neuenschwander has been working for almost 50 years and still does so today.

And she says: “I always worked best when they let me do my job and nobody asked how I did it. I went with an order and strived towards my own goals. That is my talent: working on a grassroots level where you have direct contact with the people, where you can teach them the most efficient and practical way to achieve something. That is the way I was taught, that is what made my professional life successful”.

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Elizabeth Neuenschwander – Switzerland

Elizabeth Neuenschwander has spent almost 50 years of her life working abroad. She became a dressmaker and left Emmental, a remote Swiss region, at age 19. Since the late 1950s, she has worked in developing countries for different organizations: with Tibetan refugees in Nepal and India, as a nutrition advisor in Biafra and Nigeria. Those were only a few stations on her way from a dressmaker to a project manager. Since 1986, she has worked in Quetta, Pakistan, where she founded self-help projects for Afghan refugees. In 2001, the Canton of Berne gave her the renowned Trudi-Schlatter Award.

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Hermann Scheer – Germany

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Linked with Statements at the World Future Council, (Listen to his own statement there), and with .

He is President of EUROSOLAR, General Chairman of the World Council for Renewable Energy WCRE, President of the International Parliamentary Forum on Renewable Energies, Member of the German Bundestag (english, deutsch), Publicist and author. He is honoured with the Right Livelihood Award 1999, with the Solar World Prize 1998, the Alternative Nobel Prize 1999 (mentionned here), the World Prize on Bioenergy 2000 (mentionned here), and the World Wind Energy Award 2004.

His english Homepage, and his Homepage in german.

He says: “Renewable energies are inexhaustible. They do not destroy the environment. They are available everywhere. Their use facilitates solidarity with future generations. They secure the future of humankind”. And: “… in 100 years people will say: the work is done, we are living in the Solar Age.”

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Hermann Scheer – Germany

Listen to his 3 videos on Big Picture.

Next Events:

China Alternative Energy 2007 Conference, March 26th – 27th, 2007, Beijing. (full text). Registration, Newsletter.

Ukraine: Conference on Renewable Energy, organized by the Friedrich Ebert Foundation, April 4th – 6th, 2007, Kiev/Ukraine. (full text). (In russian).

World Sustainable Energy Forum (Homepage), July 2nd – 6th, 2007, Lucerne/Switzerland, (Registration for the Lucerne FUEL CELL FORUM 2007).

9th EUROSOLAR Conference ‘The farmer as energy supplier’, April 16th-17th, 2007, Potsdam. (full text, select english or german).

Hermann Scheer was born in 1944 and has a Ph. D. in economics and social sciences … He believes that the continuation of current patterns of energy use will be environmentally catasrophic and the end of human civilisation.

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Kamal Nazer Yasin – Iran

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Kamal Nazer Yasin is a pseudonym for a freelance journalist specializing in Iranian affairs.

Undaunted Iran forges ahead with nuclear program: Iran presses forward with its nuclear program, brushing off threats of sanctions from the West and a possible airstrike on its facilities by Israel, as Iranian authorities gamble on their foes promising more bark than bite. By Kamal Nazer Yasin for EurasiaNet, Febr. 22, 2007, on Internat. Relations and Security Network ISN. (full text).

Read: IRAN, RAFSANJANI PRESSES POLITICAL OFFENSIVE AGAINST PRESIDENT, STRESSING MODERATION, by Kamal Nazer Yasin Febr. 21, 2007. Excerpt: … “This is the first time after the [presidential election] victory of the neo-conservatives over a year and a half ago that an individual from Iran’s political class has articulated a coherent set of policy statements in direct opposition to the present government,” noted a Tehran political scientist, who spoke on condition of anonymity. The political scientist added that opposition to Ahmadinejad’s policies had been rising, but, until now, presidential opponents lacked a figure around which they could rally. “Many people from elite circles are unhappy with the president’s stand on a range of topics – from Iran’s nuclear program to his denial of the Holocaust to his economic policy. What [Rafsanjani] has done is to tap into this sense of unease and use it to rally all the disaffected factions under his own leadership” … (full text). (same in russian).

FEAR OF ISOLATION PROMPTS IRANIAN SHI’AS TO REACH OUT TO SUNNIS, by Kamal Nazer Yasin Febr. 7, 2007. (full text). Same on: SperoNews, Febr. 12, 2007.

Read: FOES TAKE AIM AT AHMADINEJAD, by Kamal Nazer Yasin Jan. 30, 2007 (text).

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Sorry, no photo of Kamal Nazer Yasin (a pseudonym), also no bio nor any other personal information can be available.

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Manfred Max-Neef – Chile

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Linked with The Max-Neef Model of Human-Scale Development, with the Centre for Development Alternatives CEPAUR, Chile, with WHY ARE WE WHERE WE ARE? and with Statements at the World Future Council.

He classifies the fundamental human needs as: subsistence, protection, affection, understanding, participation, recreation(in the sense of leisure, time to reflect, or idleness), creation, identity and freedom. Needs are also defined according to the existential categories of being, having, doing and interacting, and from these dimensions, a 36 cell matrix is developed which can be filled with examples of satisfiers for those needs. (full text, scroll down).

He says: “There are two separate languages now – the language of economics and the language of ecology, and they do not converge. The language of economics is attractive, and remains so, because it is politically appealing. It offers promises. It is precise, authoritative, aesthetically pleasing. Policy-makers apply the models, and if they don’t work there is a tendency to conclude that it is reality that is playing tricks. The assumption is not that the models are wrong but that they must be applied with greater rigour… While the many deficiencies and limitations of the theory that supports the old paradigm must be overcome (mechanistic interpretations and inadequate indicators of well-being, among others), a theoretical body for the new paradigm must still be constructed”. (text).

Listen to his 3 videos on Big-Picture.
Listen to his video on World Future Council.

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Manfred Max-Neef – Chile

Read: The Barefoot Economist, transcript of the Broadcast on Saturday 9/03/2002.
Read: The Natural Step’s fourth Condition for Sustainability and Manfred Max-Neef’s basic Needs Analysis.
Read: The beat of a different drummer, same in spanish.
Read: Report: Transdisciplinarity in Progress.
Read: Economic growth versus genuine progress, an obsession with GDP growth could backfire.
Contemplate: Human Needs Graphic;
Read: Guest Lecture on Sustainable Wealth Creation.

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Bihodjal Rahimova – Tajikistan

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Linked with UNIFEM, and with ‘Centra Asia – Tadjikistan – Dushanbe‘ on our AEHRF pictures blog.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “My dream is to strengthen peace in my country forever, to make the life of women and children free of violence, to help my people surmount this transition period, and survive the economic crisis”.

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Bihodjal Rahimova – Tajikistan

She works for UNIFEM.

Bihojal Rahimova (born 1941) is a national adviser of the Unifem Project “Rights for the Land and Economic Safety of Rural Women” in Tajikistan. Owing to her efforts there have been significant changes in land reform legislation as well as in the state program on equal rights and possibilities for men and women. She pays special attention to the issues of access to land and credit for rural women. She brings to this task long experience as an important political figure in the Soviet Union and a profound concern for the rights of women. (Read all on 1000peacewomen 2005).

Go to Political Heroes.

links:

Women organizations in Tajikistan; and its directory;

Political heroes, (show them all);

Country Briefing Paper—Women and Gender Relations in Tajikistan.

Sorry, I can get no other information in english on Bihodjal Rahimova – Tajikistan.

Gavkhar Juraeva – Tajikistan

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Linked with European Journal of Migration and Law, and with ‘Centra Asia – Tadjikistan – Dushanbe‘ on our AEHRF pictures blog.
She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “It is very easy to hurt those who are unprotected, and very difficult to secure their safety, liberty, and happiness”.

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Gavkhar Juraeva – Tajikistan

She works for Migration and Law (ref. on Queen Mary University, London),
and for Loik.

An art historian and area studies expert by education, and an editor, writer of documentary and feature films, and political mediator by profession, Gavkhar Juraeva is devoted to serving the truth, and with it, those who suffer and need her help. In the post-Soviet period, when a bloody civil war broke out in her country, she served as a mediator and sought to protect those who suffered at the margins, on both sides of the conflict. She was forced to leave her country in 1992. Gavkhar continues her fight from Russia, her adopted home. She is a writer, editor, and critic. (Read all on 1000peacewomen 2005).

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Viloyat Mirzoyeva – Tajikistan

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Linked with UNIFEM, and with ‘Centra Asia – Tadjikistan – Dushanbe‘ on our AEHRF pictures blog.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “In my life I try to follow the commandments of Mother Teresa: Despite everything, always do good to people”.

Viloyat Mirzoyeva (born 1952) heads the Women in Development Bureau and the NGO Gender and Development, both of which promote equal rights for women in society. She trains leaders of governmental and non-governmental women’s organizations. As a result of her work, hundreds of women are successfully working in various areas of society. She has helped Tajik women create NGOs that aim to solve gender problems in Tajikistan. (Read all on 1000peacewomen 2005).

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Viloyat Mirzoyeva – Tajikistan

She works in cooperation with the Women in Development Bureau WID (1), and for Gender and Development (2).

The Youth Committee under the Tajikistan government, UNFPA office in Tajikistan and the Gender and Development Public Association opened a youth center in the Tajik southern city of Kulob, the Asia-Plus reported May 22. As Viloyat Mirzoyeva, chairwoman of the Gender and Development Public Association, told Asia-Plus it is already the fourth such a center in the republic. According to her, the Center will be engaged in solving issues related to reproductive health and family planning. (text).

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Pier Paolo Pasolini – Italia (March 5, 1922 – November 2, 1975)

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Linked with A Mad Dream.

He says: ”We should not confuse ideology with message, nor message with meaning. The message belongs in part – that of logic – to ideology, and in the other part – that of irreason – to meaning. The logical message is almost always evil, lying, hypocritical even when very sincere. Who could doubt my sincerity when I say that the message of Salò is the denunciation of the anarchy of power and the inexistence of history? Nonetheless put this way such a message is evil, lying, hypocritical, that is logical in the sense of that same logic which finds that power is not at all anarchic and which believes that history does exist. The part of the message which belongs to the meaning of the film is immensely more real because it also includes all that the author does not know, that is, the boundlessness of his own social, historical restrictions. But such a message can’t be delivered. It can only be left to silence and to the text. What finally now is the meaning of a work? It is its form. The message therefore is formalistic; and precisely for that reason, loaded infinitely with all possible content provided it is coherent – in the structural sense”. (full text).

Read: Oedipus Rex by Pier Paolo Pasolini.

Look at: Italian pictures show on pasolini.net.

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Pier Paolo Pasolini – Italia (March 5, 1922 – November 2, 1975)

Restoring Pasolini: Thirty years later, new questions arise about who murdered the Italian cultural genius.
Pasolini death inquiry reopened.

Success and charges: In 1954 Pasolini, who now worked for the literature section of the Italian State radio, left his teaching job and moved to the Monteverde quarter and published La meglio gioventù, his first important collection of dialect poems. His first novel, Ragazzi di vita, was published in 1955.

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Peter Waterman – England

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Linked with The Voice of the Turtle, with Reflections on an Emancipatory Labour Internationalism … , with Surpassing the binary opposition between reform and revolution.

He says (about Archaic left challenges … ): ”… It is a counter-hegemonic movement from the period of national-industrial-colonial capitalism. This was a machine-age capitalism, and it gave rise to mechanical interpretations of Marxism. MR belongs, more specifically, to the ‘Marxist-Leninist’ (Maoist) tendency and is linked (in more than a cyberspace sense) with the International League of Peoples Struggles, (ILPS) and the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP). This movement considers discussion and analysis of the rights and wrongs of globalisation to be a derogation from a 100-year-old Leninist theory of imperialism. It is therefore suspicious of or hostile to the anti-globalisation movement. The only concession it will make to the new movement is that it has managed to capture a widespread and multifarious discontent internationally. It therefore becomes a suitable object for penetration and/or competition. This movement pursues a Marxism of binary opposition, a Manichean Marxism with oppositions … “. (full long text).

Read: Global Social Labour Movement, Updated June 30, 2006.

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Peter Waterman – England

Read: From Decent Work to The Liberation of Time from Work.

Abstract: The traditional international union organisations are currently engaged in a series of ’social partnership’ initiatives at global level. Prominent amongst these is that addressed to ‘global governance’. This project comes from outside and above the unions, is addressed to the existing hegemonic interstate instances, and is carried out primarily by lobbying.

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Mubarak Gurbanova – Turkmenistan

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Linked with CANGO.net.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “Your work will wait for you to show natural phenomena and rainbows to your child, but these will not wait until you finish your work”.

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Sorry, I can not find any photo of Mubarak Gurbanova, Turkmenistan (see also my comment ‘Brave women without photos‘, added on June 17, 2007).

She works for Medet (1), and for Civic Dignity.

Mubarak Gurbanova is the head of the NGO Medet. She provides educational and job training opportunities to refugees, orphans, the young and the economically deprived. In four years, she has organized 100 seminars for 4000 people. She trains school teachers in the use of the new educational pedagogy on critical comprehension. As part of the Civic Dignity team she contributes to building a civil society in Turkmenistan, by providing training in civic education.

She is generous and caring towards others and is involved in many charities, without seeking her own recognition.

Mubarak was born on 17 May 1963 in the village of Goynuk in the Lebap region, Turkmenistan. She is one of nine children, and before her parents retired her mother worked as a doctor’s assistant. Her father was a teacher.

She has great enthusiasm for the English language, and when she graduated from High School in 1980 she entered the English Department of Foreign Languages faculty of Turkmen Pedagogical Institute in Charjew. In 1984 she successfully graduated from the Institute and gained a Diploma as an English teacher. In 1987 Mubarak began working as a first grade teacher, while still pursuing her dream to be appointed as an English teacher. In 1989 this dream became a reality in a school in the city of Charjew.

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Dilorom Mukhsinova – Uzbekistan

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Linked with CANGO.net.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

She says: “To build a bright future we must educate the people who will construct it – our children – in the spirit of peace, love, and freedom”.

Dilorom Mukhsinova was born in 1952 in Ferghana, Uzbekistan. She has been a school secondary school teacher since 1973, whose dedication to teaching is appreciated by the local community, her colleagues, students and their parents. She is devoted to peace, freedom, and tolerance and the development of mutual understanding between people despite different views and social backgrounds. This is especially important in this region, the center of a major conflict zone in Central Asia with the danger of extremist tendencies increasing among youth and the local

population. Dilorom’s teaching supports tolerance and respect for the diverse cultures of the world and is a significant contribution to peace and harmony in her community.

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Dilorom Mukhsinova – Uzbekistan

She works for the Town Council.

She graduated from Ferghana State Pedagogical Institute, English Language Department in 1973 and the Historical Department of the same Institute in 1979. She has been working since 1973 as an English and history teacher and has also been a guide for tourists in Uzbekistan. She has taught both at Ferghana State Pedagogical Institute and at a local secondary school. She has served as Deputy Directory at her school and is currently the supervisor of foreign language teachers. She was elected as a deputy of the town council of the first convocation (1995-2000) and has received an award for her role in the education of people in Uzbekistan. She is married and has two children.

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Paul Rice – USA

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Linked with Fair Traide Certified (TransFairUSA), with ashoka, and with Fair Trade and Human Rights.

Paul Rice is President and CEO of TransFair USA, the only Fair Trade certifier in the United States. In 2000 he received the Ashoka Fellowship for his pioneering work in fair trade and in 2002 he was named by the Klaus Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship as one of the world’s top 40 Social Entrepreneurs. He has authored several publications including “Sustainable Coffee at the Crossroads.” Paul Rice talks about how fair trade can help align the interests of corporations and small farmers without sacrificing profitability. As companies look to reduce costs in an increasingly competitive world, the welfare of small producers can be marginalized. Rice describes how fair trade can empower poor farmers by giving them the opportunity to trade directly with buyers and earn a better price for their produce. Find the link to his video/audio on the same swebpage.

He says: ”That’s simple: we’re the only certifier of Fair Trade products in the US. In the coffee area, we have signed agreements with almost 300 coffee companies, including Starbucks, Sara Lee and Green Mountain”. (full text).

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Paul Rice – USA

He works for Fair Traide Certified (TransFairUSA).

See Paul Rice, on heroes.net, on Schwab Foundation, on ashhoka.org.

Click on this web page for his 7 minutes audio.

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Byllye Avery – USA

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Linked with the Avery Institute for Social Change, with An Open Letter to my Sisters, with The Health Care Crisis … , and with the National Black Women’s Health Imperative.

Byllye Yvonne Avery (born 1937) is a health care activist in the United States of America. She has worked to improve the welfare of African-American women by creating the National Black Women’s Health Imperative in 1981. She has received the MacArthur Foundation’s Fellowship for Social Contribution and the Gustav O. Lienhard Award for the Advancement of Health Care from the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Science, among other awards. Avery was born in DeLand, Florida. She studied psychology at Talledega College, and earned an MA degree from the University of Florida in 1969. In 1995 Avery received a L.H.D. from Bates College. Avery produced the documentary film ‘On Becoming a Woman, Mothers and Daughters Talking to Each Other’ (1987). It features African-American women and their daughters talking about menstruation and related topics, such as sex and love. She has said that, when her own daughter menstruated for the first time, Avery threw a party for her. (full text).

Listen here to her many videos.

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Byllye Avery – USA

She works for the National Black Women’s Health Imperative, and also for the Avery Institute for Social Change.
In 1974, she co-founded the Gainesville Women’s Health Center, a first-trimester abortion center. Four years later, she co-founded Birthplace, an alternative birthing center where families could deliver their babies with the aid of a certified midwife.

She says: “Black women all participated in a conspiracy of silence” … and: “white women were defining health in their own perspective, which was usually focused on reproductive issues. We needed to come together as black women to define the issues most affecting black women.”

While Avery was knee-deep in women’s health issues, however, she realized a significant group of people were underrepresented: black women.

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Jane Roberts and Lois Abraham – USA

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Linked with UNFPA, with 34 Million Friends of UNFPA, and with Americans for UNFPA.

They are two of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

Thoraya Obaid says about them: “Lois and Jane demonstrated that citizens in the US understand that family planning, safe motherhood, and HIV/AIDS prevention are essential”.

Lois Abraham says: The fund, “doesn’t impose cultural values, by working with the culture, you set the groundwork for change to be long lasting”. And: “It is amazing what a little generosity can do”.

Jane Roberts said: “No other country has ever de-funded UNFPA for other than fiscal reasons. The country of Mali, which is one of the 10 poorest countries in the world, gives $3,000 a year. It’s just … something that you do. It’s part of a social contract, and we have reneged on this contract. Lois and I find this absolutely appalling”.

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Jane Roberts and Lois Abraham – USA

They work for 34 Million Friends of UNFPA, and for Americans for UNFPA.

Money put to use, The first $1 million raised was used very practically:

  • In Timor Leste, for example, the money went to fill modest but utilitarian needs;
  • Purchasing two-way radios to connect the only two hospitals providing emergency obstetric care;
  • Training three Timorese doctors outside the two hospitals to perform Caesarean sections, an urgently needed service;
  • Providing 80 motorcycles for midwives to reach women living in areas with poor roads or without public transportation.

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Ha-Joon Chang – South Korea & England

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Linked with Is Equality Passé? with Kicking Away the Ladder, and with … Institutions and Economic Development … .

Ha-Joon Chang, born 1963 in South Korea, is one of the world’s foremost heterodox economists specialising in development economics. Trained at the University of Cambridge, where he currently works as a Reader in the Political Economy of Development, Chang is the author of several influential policy books, including 2002’s “Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective,” He has served as a consultant to the World Bank and the European Investment Bank as well as to Oxfam and various United Nations agencies. He is also a fellow at the D.C.-based Center for Economic and Policy Research. Chang is among the most widely cited economists in the development literature, especially in articles and books that are critical of neo-liberalism. In “Kicking Away the Ladder” (which won the 2003 Gunnar Myrdal Prize), Chang argued that all major developed countries used interventionist economic policies in order to get rich and then tried to forbid other countries from doing similarly. (full text).

Read: why developing countries need tariffs.

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Ha-Joon Chang – Korea & England

He says: ”In the orthodox literature, it is uncritically assumed that a stronger protection of property rights is always better. However, this cannot be true as a general proposition. The fact that some protection of property rights is good does not mean that more of it is always better.

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Samuel Bowles – USA

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Linked with Social Preferences and Public Economics, and with Is Equality Passé?

Samuel Bowles is an American economist and Professor Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst where he taught courses on microeconomics and the theory of institutions. Bowles graduated with a B.A. from Yale in 1960 and afterwards, continued on to get his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 1965. Currently, Bowles is a Professor of Economics at the University of Siena, Italy, and the Arthur Spiegel Research Professor and Director of the Behavioral Sciences Program at the Santa Fe Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico. (full text).

Wikipedia’s disambiguation page about two Samuel Bowles.

Sam Bowles’ didactic webpage.

Bowles’ recent papers and other information can be found on his webpage; also on Sam Bowles’.

Read: The Inheritance of Inequality, by Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis, July 14, 2002.

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Samuel Bowles – USA

Samuel Bowles in the Santa Fe Institute, and his Abbreviated CV in University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

On his website at the Sante Fe Institute, he describes his two main academic interests as first, “the co-evolution of preferences, institutions and behavior, with emphasis on the modeling and empirical study of cultural evolution, the importance and evolution of non-self-regarding motives in explaining behavior, and applications of these studies to policy areas such as intellectual property rights, the economics of education and the politics of government redistributive programs.”

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Peter Hardstaff – England

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Linked with The World Development Movement WDM.

Linked also with Mohau Pheko – South Africa, with The WDM Death Counter, with The International Gender and Trade Network IGTN, and with New social justice movements in a changing reality.

Peter Hardstaff is the Head of Policy, World Development Movement (WDM). As Head of Policy, Peter Hardstaff is responsible for facilitating development of policy, research and advocacy work to support WDM’s campaigns. Prior to joining WDM in April 2002, Peter spent three years leading research and advocacy work on international trade policy issues at the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. Before joining the RSPB he was a consultant, researching, writing and designing a web site on international trade issues for Friends of the Earth, where he had previously worked for 5 years on forests and wildlife issues. Peter has a degree in Environmental Sciences from the University of East Anglia and a first class Masters degree in Natural Resource Management from Edinburgh University. (Radical Statistics Issue 89).

He says (about G8 2005): ””The final communique is an insult to the hundreds of thousands of campaigners who listened in good faith to the world leaders’ claim that they were willing to seriously address poverty in Africa. More importantly it is a disaster for the world’s poor. The agreements on trade, debt, aid and climate change are nowhere near sufficient to tackle the global poverty and environmental crisis we face” … and: “The G8’s approach on trade seems to be ‘Ask not what we can do for the poor, but what the poor can do for us,’”. (full text).

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Peter Hardstaff – England

Read: Peter Hardstaff (2000), The Biosafety Protocol, An Analysis.

And he says: “We are tired of world leaders heaping praise on Make Poverty History while simultaneously stabbing us in the back by breaking their promises.” (full text).

Read: Press release: our world is not for sale!

He said also, responding to the outcome of the G8 summit, World Development Movement (WDM) Head of Policy: “The final communique is an insult to the hundreds of thousands of campaigners who listened in good faith to the world leaders’ claim that they were willing to seriously address poverty in Africa. More importantly it is a disaster for the world’s poor.

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Lalita Ramdas – India

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She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

They tell about her: “Lalita Ramdas stepped out of a conventional and hierarchical environment to become a fearless voice in support of secularism, peace, and nuclear disarmament, often in very troubled times”.

Read: The Politics of Cricket ó Some Reflections, by Lalita Ramdas.

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Lalita Ramdas – India

She works for the Pak-India Forum for Peace and Democracy PIFPD (mentionned only once, on ‘Proceedings, Recommendations and Declaration of The Third Joint Convention Calcutta‘, December 28-31, 1996).

Lalita Ramdas (born 1940) stepped out of a conventional, hierarchical environment to become a voice in support of alternative education, gender sensitivity, secularism, peace, and nuclear disarmament. In the early 1980s, she put in place pathbreaking initiatives for development education in a number of elite schools. Living in a small village in India’s west coast, she is involved in the life of the local community while pursuing citizens’ peace initiatives with Pakistan and contributing to the global adult education movement.One day she is sitting with a group of teachers in a village school talking about the violence that often characterizes local election processes, and how teachers can try to counter this by instilling values such as mutual respect, non-violence, and harmony in the minds of the young.

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Annapurna Moharana – India

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Linked with Sarvodaya, Sri Lanka.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

They says about her: “As there was a curfew in town, the oath-taking ceremony was held inside Annapurna’s house:

13-year-old Annapurna also took it-a vow to serve the country, which she keeps to this day”.

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Annapurna Moharana – India

She works for the Kasturba Gandhi Memorial National Trust KGMNT, for Sarvodaya,
and for the Utkal Naagari Lipi Parishad UNLP (no website).

Annapurna Moharana has been working since she was 13 to carry forward the Gandhian tradition of peaceful protest and refusing to compromise with corruption or oppression. In the past 75-odd years, Annapurna has worked on issues ranging from setting up a tribal residential school for girls, sensitizing dacoits (members of robber bands) to pacifism, and resisting the 1975 emergency, to setting up a nursing training center that recruits and trains young women in maternity services.

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Duiji – India

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Linked with the Mahila Samakhya Programme, and with the Educational Resource Unit ERU.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

They say about her: “A single tribal woman day laborer stood up to usurious landowners, and then went on to change the developmental complexion of an entire village”.

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Duiji – India

She learned by the connection with the Mahila Samakhya Programme.

Duiji (born 1942) has single-handedly changed the face of an entire village. She mobilized her community against caste-based oppression and injustice. Her efforts have led to a drastic reduction in atrocities against the Kol community. Caste-based sexual violence is practically nonexistent in her village now, and the tribals are no longer afraid of approaching the police and courts for redress. The literacy rates have shot up and the women participate more actively in community affairs.

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Rajni Kumar – India

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Linked with National Bal Bhavan, and with The Springdales Education Society.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

It is told about her: Rajni’s vision is to find ways to make the educational systems more humane, equitable, and relevant to the changing world scenario, using technology to link schools and youth globally.

Mrs. Rajni Kumar, Chairperson, Springdales Education Society, has been honoured an Honorary Doctorate degree by the Middlesex University, London, at Wembley Conference Centre on July 6th 2005. (full text).

She says: “They taught and I learnt. More importantly, through these Punjabi girls and their displaced families, I was brought face-to-face with the harsh realities of life: how lives can be shattered overnight, and how people can find the resilience and the courage to pick up the threads and build their lives anew. I marveled at it. Education was their lifeline for tomorrow. And working together, we forged lifelong friendships that endure even today”.

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Rajni Kumar – India (formerly Nancie Joyce Margaret Jones)

She works for the Springdales School, New Delhi.

Rajni Kumar (formerly, Nancie Joyce Margaret Jones) was born in England on 5 March 1923 to British parents and educated at Tollington Grammar School, London. She came to India with her Indian fiancé to join the freedom struggle, and made the country her home. In 1950, she set up a school for girls displaced by the partition. This work led her to conceptualize an institution that would link the process of education with life itself, and Springdales School was born in 1955. Her many innovative school programs’ incorporating peace and human rights education in the curriculum, literacy projects, the ‘adopt a gran’ project, and many others have altered India’s outlook on education.

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Murari Prameela – India

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Linked with Indian HIV & AIDS statistic.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

It is said about Murari Prameela: She is a dear carer to victims of HIV/AIDS and those abandoned by their families and friends in her native Guntur district, which has one of the highest percentages of HIV/Aids in India.

She says: “I do not believe in hearing a lot of lecture on love. It is our actions that matter”. And she said about a girl they cared: “We were not able to save her, but we took care of her, enabling her to live for another three years”.

She says also: “Not many people can afford medical care. The people who live on the streets do not have money or people to look after them”.

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Murari Prameela – India

She works for Women for the Mercy Integrated Rural Health Care Ministries (Sorry, link not found in the internet).

A nurse and multipurpose healthworker who leads a team of seven in her native Guntur district in Andhra Pradesh, Murari Prameela is a friend and a carer for the sick and the dying. She targets sick people abandoned by their families. On average, she helps about 300 patients a month, among them Aids/HIV sufferers, and patients with leprosy, tuberculosis, high blood pressure, and heart trouble. Murari and her team also help polio-stricken children, street-children, sick beggars, and impoverished pregnant women who have little support and no access to healthcare. A lesson on Mother Theresa in her 8th grade reader inspired Murari Prameela, a resident of Guntur district in Andhra Pradesh, to follow in her footsteps. There was much to be done since most people here were extremely poor, and 70 per cent of the population lived in villages, working mostly as agricultural laborers with scant access to medicare.

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Leelakumari Amma – India

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Linked with Schools in Kerala, India.

She is one of the 1000 women proposed for the Nobel Peace Price 2005.

People tell about her: Leelakumari’s motivation and pragmatism are exemplary, her signal ability being to draw diverse parties into her struggle: villagers, courts, political parties, environmental groups, and doctors.

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Leelakumari Amma – India

She works for the Government of Kerala.

Leelakumari Amma (born 1948) won a one-woman campaign against the pesticide lobby, government departments, and her village’s powerful plantation owners. Upon realizing that the spraying of the pesticide Endosulfan (classified as “highly toxic” by the US Environmental Protection Agency) was endangering her son’s health, she won a court order banning the aerial spraying of pesticides on her village. Her struggle has set off wide-ranging discussions on pesticide impact on health, with countries such as Cambodia banning the use of Endosulfan.Leelakumari Amma, the seventh of eleven children, was born on February 25, 1948 in a small village called Kizhuthiri near Ramapuram in Kottayam district, Kerala. Her father was a primary school teacher, her mother a home-maker. When Leelakumari was two years old, her family moved to Payyavur in Kannur district in northern Kerala (then called Malabar): her father had been asked by a Christian missionary to teach in a new school being set up for the settlers. While at school, Leelakumari joined up for an agriculture certificate course.

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Shalini Randeria – India

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Shalini Randeria studied sociology and Indology at the Universities of Dehli, Oxford and Heidelberg. She received her Ph.D. from the Free University of Berlin, where she has been teaching social anthropology and sociology since 1986.
She is now a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. Her research interests are in the fields of legal anthropology, anthropological demography and developmental studies. She has also carried out fieldwork in India and has been cooperating actively with grassroots movements in India and development organizations in Germany (November 2006). (text).

She says: “From Kerala (Indian Province) one can learn, that communisme looks different when made in a not communist country: the Kerala (communist) Government spends 60% of its budget for health care and school development. Result: higher school level for all, less death children, excellent health situation, better gender equality, and: the population growth is practically at the same level as in Europe. And the best: this is reached without higher taxes than in the rest of the country”, german-Swiss TV-talk, Jan. 21, 2007. (My comment: this guys are just not corrupt, but really use the monney for the people, instead of stealing it for their own caste).

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Shalini Randeria – India

See a (french) travel report from a suburb of north of Mumbai, Kandivali East, with many pictures, on my privat blog, from Dec. 09, 2006, to January 12, 2007 (pull down on the left column of the Homepage, click on December 2006 or/and on January 2007 and find the dates).

Find also a resumee of all posts on these blogs concerning slums.

She says also: “In India one part of the population has always paid the economy, the progress, the wealth. This not only in globalization times … economic progress is certain, but the redistribution happens only with difficulty … 70% of the Indians live still in rural aereas … and when changes happen (slum -aereas are reconstructed into new city-towers), the right question is: who is relocated, and for what?” german-Swiss TV-talk, Jan. 21, 2007.

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